Identification of protein kinase inhibitors with a selective negative effect on the viability of Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell lines

Vassilis Mavromatidis, Z. Varga, Frigyes Waczek, Zoltán Orfi, L. Őrfi, G. Kéri, George Mosialos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human herpesvirus, which is causally associated with the development of several B lymphocytic malignancies that include Burkitt's lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, AIDS and posttransplant associated lymphomas. The transforming activity of EBV is orchestrated by several latent viral proteins that mimic and modulate cellular growth promoting and antiapoptotic signaling pathways, which involve among others the activity of protein kinases. In an effort to identify small molecule inhibitors of the growth of EBV-transformed B lymphocytes a library of 254 kinase inhibitors was screened. This effort identified two tyrosine kinase inhibitors and two MEK inhibitors that compromised preferentially the viability of EBV-infected human B lymphocytes. Our findings highlight the possible dependence of EBV-infected B lymphocytes on specific kinase-regulated pathways underlining the potential for the development of small molecule-based therapeutics that could target selectively EBV-associated human B lymphocyte malignancies.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere95688
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 23 2014

Fingerprint

Human herpesvirus 4
Protein Kinase Inhibitors
Human Herpesvirus 4
Viruses
protein kinases
B-lymphocytes
B-Lymphocytes
Lymphocytes
Cells
cell lines
viability
Cell Line
phosphotransferases (kinases)
lymphoma
Phosphotransferases
AIDS-Related Lymphoma
Hodgkin disease
Growth Inhibitors
Molecules
Burkitt Lymphoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Identification of protein kinase inhibitors with a selective negative effect on the viability of Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell lines. / Mavromatidis, Vassilis; Varga, Z.; Waczek, Frigyes; Orfi, Zoltán; Őrfi, L.; Kéri, G.; Mosialos, George.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 4, e95688, 23.04.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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