Identification of a recently active Prunus-specific non-autonomous Mutator element with considerable genome shaping force

Júlia Halász, Ossama Kodad, A. Hegedüs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are known to contribute to the evolution of plants, but only limited information is available for MITEs in the Prunus genome. We identified a MITE that has been named Falling Stones, FaSt. All structural features (349-bp size, 82-bp terminal inverted repeats and 9-bp target site duplications) are consistent with this MITE being a putative member of the Mutator transposase superfamily. FaSt showed a preferential accumulation in the short AT-rich segments of the euchromatin region of the peach genome. DNA sequencing and pollination experiments have been performed to confirm that the nested insertion of FaSt into the S-haplotype-specific F-box gene of apricot resulted in the breakdown of self-incompatibility (SI). A bioinformatics-based survey of the known Rosaceae and other genomes and a newly designed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay verified the Prunoideae-specific occurrence of FaSt elements. Phylogenetic analysis suggested a recent activity of FaSt in the Prunus genome. The occurrence of a nested insertion in the apricot genome further supports the recent activity of FaSt in response to abiotic stress conditions. This study reports on a presumably active non-autonomous Mutator element in Prunus that exhibits a major indirect genome shaping force through inducing loss-of-function mutation in the SI locus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)220-231
Number of pages12
JournalPlant Journal
Volume79
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Prunus
miniature inverted repeat transposable elements
DNA Transposable Elements
Genome
genome
apricots
Euchromatin
Rosaceae
Transposases
Pollination
terminal repeat sequences
Terminal Repeat Sequences
Computational Biology
DNA Sequence Analysis
bioinformatics
Haplotypes
peaches
abiotic stress
pollination
haplotypes

Keywords

  • apricot
  • loss-of-function mutation
  • miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements
  • Mutator transposon
  • Prunus
  • S-haplotype-specific F-box
  • self-compatibility
  • transposition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology
  • Genetics
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Identification of a recently active Prunus-specific non-autonomous Mutator element with considerable genome shaping force. / Halász, Júlia; Kodad, Ossama; Hegedüs, A.

In: Plant Journal, Vol. 79, No. 2, 2014, p. 220-231.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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