Hypoxia-induced generation of methane in mitochondria and eukaryotic cells - An alternative approach to methanogenesis

M. Ghyczy-, Csilla Torday, J. Kaszaki, Andrea Szabó, Miklós Czóbel, M. Borós

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Aims: Electrophilic methyl groups bound to positively charged nitrogen moieties may act as electron acceptors, and this mechanism could lead to the generation of methane from choline. The aims were to characterize the methanogenic potential of phosphatidylcholine metabolites, and to define the in vivo relevance of this pathway in hypoxia-induced cellular responses. Methods: The postulated reaction was investigated (1) in model chemical experiments, (2) in rat mitochondrial subfractions and (3) in bovine endothelial cell cultures under hypoxic conditions and in the presence of hydroxyl radical generation. The rate of methane formation was determined by gas chromatography with flame-ionisation detectors. The lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence assay was used to determine the reactive oxygen species-scavenging capacity of the choline metabolites. Results: Significant methane generation was demonstrated in all three series of experiments. Phosphatidylcholine metabolites with alcoholic moiety in the molecule (i.e. choline, N,N-dimethylethanolamine and N-methylethanolamine), inhibited oxygen radical production both in vitro and in vivo, and displayed an effectiveness proportional to the amount of methane generated and the number of methyl groups in the compounds. Conclusion: Methane generation occurs in aerobic systems. Phosphatidylcholine metabolites containing both electron donor and acceptor groups may have a function to counteract intracellular oxygen radical production.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)251-258
Number of pages8
JournalCellular Physiology and Biochemistry
Volume21
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Methane
Eukaryotic Cells
Mitochondria
Choline
Phosphatidylcholines
Reactive Oxygen Species
Deanol
Electrons
Chemical Models
Flame Ionization
Cell Hypoxia
Luminescence
Gas Chromatography
Hydroxyl Radical
Nitrogen
Endothelial Cells
Cell Culture Techniques
Hypoxia

Keywords

  • Hypoxia
  • Oxidative stress
  • Phosphatidylcholine
  • Redox homeostasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Hypoxia-induced generation of methane in mitochondria and eukaryotic cells - An alternative approach to methanogenesis. / Ghyczy-, M.; Torday, Csilla; Kaszaki, J.; Szabó, Andrea; Czóbel, Miklós; Borós, M.

In: Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry, Vol. 21, No. 1-3, 2008, p. 251-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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