Hypothermia translocates nitric oxide synthase from cytosol to membrane in snail neurons

Tamás Roszer, Éva Kiss-Tóth, Dávid Rózsa, Tamás Józsa, A. József Szentmiklósi, G. Bánfalvi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neuronal nitric oxide (NO) levels are modulated through the control of catalytic activity of NO synthase (NOS). Although signals limiting excess NO synthesis are being extensively studied in the vertebrate nervous system, our knowledge is rather limited on the control of NOS in neurons of invertebrates. We have previously reported a transient inactivation of NOS in hibernating snails. In the present study, we aimed to understand the mechanism leading to blocked NO production during hypothermic periods of Helix pomatia. We have found that hypothermic challenge translocated NOS from the cytosol to the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum, and that this cytosol to membrane trafficking was essential for inhibition of NO synthesis. Cold stress also downregulated NOS mRNA levels in snail neurons, although the amount of NOS protein remained unaffected in response to hypothermia. Our studies with cultured neurons and glia cells revealed that glia-neuron signaling may inhibit membrane binding and inactivation of NOS. We provide evidence that hypothermia keeps NO synthesis "hibernated" through subcellular redistribution of NOS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-203
Number of pages13
JournalCell and Tissue Research
Volume342
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2010

Fingerprint

Snails
Hypothermia
Nitric Oxide Synthase
Cytosol
Neurons
Membranes
Nitric Oxide
Neuroglia
Invertebrates
Endoplasmic Reticulum
Nervous System
Vertebrates
Down-Regulation
Messenger RNA

Keywords

  • Cold stress
  • Invertebrates
  • Nervous system
  • Neurotransmitters
  • Protein translocation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Cell Biology
  • Histology

Cite this

Hypothermia translocates nitric oxide synthase from cytosol to membrane in snail neurons. / Roszer, Tamás; Kiss-Tóth, Éva; Rózsa, Dávid; Józsa, Tamás; Szentmiklósi, A. József; Bánfalvi, G.

In: Cell and Tissue Research, Vol. 342, No. 2, 11.2010, p. 191-203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roszer, Tamás ; Kiss-Tóth, Éva ; Rózsa, Dávid ; Józsa, Tamás ; Szentmiklósi, A. József ; Bánfalvi, G. / Hypothermia translocates nitric oxide synthase from cytosol to membrane in snail neurons. In: Cell and Tissue Research. 2010 ; Vol. 342, No. 2. pp. 191-203.
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