Magas vérnyomás vagy depresszió? Rossz házasságban másképp betegek a férfiak és másképp a nôk

Translated title of the contribution: Hypertension or depression? In bad marriages, men may react differently than women

Balog Piroska, Dégi L. Csaba, Szabó Gábor, Susánszky Anna, Stauder Adrienne, Székely Andrea, Paul Falger, M. Kopp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to clarify the association of marital distress with hypertension and depression, based on a representative health survey, the Hungarostudy 2002. We analyzed data on all men and women younger than age 65, who were married or cohabitating and economically active at the time of examination. Marital distress (shortened Stockholm Marital Stress Scale) and depressive symptoms (shortened Beck Depression Inventory) were included in the survey. All subjects who during the past year had been diagnosed by a physician as suffering from hypertension or depression, and had been treated accordingly (self-report), were classified as "hypertensive" or "depressed". Hierarchical logistic regression analyses evaluated the effects of marital distress on hypertensive or depressed subjects, compared to controls who did not report health complaints. Analyses were adjusted for age, education, SES, BMI, and lifestyle (smoking, alcohol use and physical activity). Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. In men, but not in women, marital distress was independently associated with current treatment for hypertension. A man having a bad marriage runs a double risk of being treated for hypertension, compared to having a good marriage. In women, but not in men, marital distress was associated with elevated risk of treatment for depression. A woman having a bad marriage runs more than a double risk of being treated for depression, compared to living a good marriage. Based on these data, in men, marital distress was independently associated with elevated risk for hypertension treatment, whereas in women, marital distress was independently associated with risk for depression treatment.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)313-333
Number of pages21
JournalMentalhigiene es Pszichoszomatika
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010

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Marriage
Depression
Hypertension
Therapeutics
Health Surveys
Self Report
Life Style
Logistic Models
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Alcohols
Confidence Intervals
Exercise
Physicians
Education
Equipment and Supplies
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Magas vérnyomás vagy depresszió? Rossz házasságban másképp betegek a férfiak és másképp a nôk. / Piroska, Balog; Csaba, Dégi L.; Gábor, Szabó; Anna, Susánszky; Adrienne, Stauder; Andrea, Székely; Falger, Paul; Kopp, M.

In: Mentalhigiene es Pszichoszomatika, Vol. 11, No. 4, 12.2010, p. 313-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Piroska, Balog ; Csaba, Dégi L. ; Gábor, Szabó ; Anna, Susánszky ; Adrienne, Stauder ; Andrea, Székely ; Falger, Paul ; Kopp, M. / Magas vérnyomás vagy depresszió? Rossz házasságban másképp betegek a férfiak és másképp a nôk. In: Mentalhigiene es Pszichoszomatika. 2010 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 313-333.
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