Hydrotherapy, balneotherapy, and spa treatment in pain management

T. Bender, Zeki Karagülle, G. Bálint, Christoph Gutenbrunner, P. Bálint, Shaul Sukenik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

176 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of water for medical treatment is probably as old as mankind. Until the middle of the last century, spa treatment, including hydrotherapy and balneotherapy, remained popular but went into decline especially in the Anglo-Saxon world with the development of effective analgesics. However, no analgesic, regardless of its potency, is capable of eliminating pain, and reports of life-threatening adverse reactions to the use of these drugs led to renewed interest in spa therapy. Because of methodologic difficulties and lack of research funding, the effects of 'water treatments' in the relief of pain have rarely been subjected to rigorous assessment by randomised, controlled trials. It is our opinion that the three therapeutic modalities must be considered separately, and this was done in the present paper. In addition, we review the research on the mechanism of action and cost effectiveness of such treatments and examine what research might be useful in the future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)220-224
Number of pages5
JournalRheumatology International
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Hydrotherapy
Balneology
Pain Management
Water Purification
Analgesics
Research
Pain
Therapeutics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Balneotherapy
  • Hydrotherapy
  • Water treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Hydrotherapy, balneotherapy, and spa treatment in pain management. / Bender, T.; Karagülle, Zeki; Bálint, G.; Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Bálint, P.; Sukenik, Shaul.

In: Rheumatology International, Vol. 25, No. 3, 2005, p. 220-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bender, T. ; Karagülle, Zeki ; Bálint, G. ; Gutenbrunner, Christoph ; Bálint, P. ; Sukenik, Shaul. / Hydrotherapy, balneotherapy, and spa treatment in pain management. In: Rheumatology International. 2005 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 220-224.
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