Hydrogen is neuroprotective and preserves cerebrovascular reactivity in asphyxiated newborn pigs

F. Domoki, Orsolya Oláh, Aliz Zimmermann, István NImeth, Valiria Tóth-Szüki, Marietta Hugyecz, Piter Temesvári, F. Bari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hydrogen (H2) has been reported to neutralize toxic reactive oxygen species. Oxidative stress is an important mechanism of neuronal damage after perinatal asphyxia. We examined whether 2.1% H2-supplemented room air (H2-RA) ventilation would preserve cerebrovascular reactivity (CR) and brain morphology after asphyxia/reventilation (A/R) in newborn pigs. Anesthetized, ventilated piglets were assigned to one of the following groups: A/R with RA or H2-RA ventilation (A/R-RA and A/R-H2-RA; n = 8 and 7, respectively) and respective time control groups (n = 9 and 7). Asphyxia was induced by suspending ventilation for 10 min, followed by reventilation with the respective gases for 4 h. After euthanasia, the brains were processed for neuropathological examination. Pial arteriolar diameter changes to graded hypercapnia (5-10% CO2 inhalation), and NMDA (10 M) were determined using the closed cranial window/intravital microscopy before and 1 h after asphyxia. Neuropathology revealed that H2-RA ventilation significantly reduced neuronal injury induced by A/R in virtually all examined brain regions including the cerebral cortex, the hippocampus, basal ganglia, cerebellum, and the brainstem. Furthermore, H2-RA ventilation significantly increased CR to hypercapnia after A/R (% vasodilation was 23 ± 4% versus 41 ± 9%, p <0.05). H2-RA ventilation did not affect reactive oxygen species-dependent CR to NMDA. In summary, H2-RA could be a promising approach to reduce the neurologic deficits after perinatal asphyxia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)387-392
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Research
Volume68
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2010

Fingerprint

Hydrogen
Asphyxia
Swine
Ventilation
Air
Hypercapnia
N-Methylaspartate
Reactive Oxygen Species
Brain
Euthanasia
Poisons
Neurologic Manifestations
Basal Ganglia
Vasodilation
Cerebral Cortex
Cerebellum
Inhalation
Brain Stem
Hippocampus
Oxidative Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Hydrogen is neuroprotective and preserves cerebrovascular reactivity in asphyxiated newborn pigs. / Domoki, F.; Oláh, Orsolya; Zimmermann, Aliz; NImeth, István; Tóth-Szüki, Valiria; Hugyecz, Marietta; Temesvári, Piter; Bari, F.

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 68, No. 5, 11.2010, p. 387-392.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Domoki, F, Oláh, O, Zimmermann, A, NImeth, I, Tóth-Szüki, V, Hugyecz, M, Temesvári, P & Bari, F 2010, 'Hydrogen is neuroprotective and preserves cerebrovascular reactivity in asphyxiated newborn pigs', Pediatric Research, vol. 68, no. 5, pp. 387-392. https://doi.org/10.1203/PDR.0b013e3181f2e81c
Domoki, F. ; Oláh, Orsolya ; Zimmermann, Aliz ; NImeth, István ; Tóth-Szüki, Valiria ; Hugyecz, Marietta ; Temesvári, Piter ; Bari, F. / Hydrogen is neuroprotective and preserves cerebrovascular reactivity in asphyxiated newborn pigs. In: Pediatric Research. 2010 ; Vol. 68, No. 5. pp. 387-392.
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