Human fetuin/α2HS-glycoprotein level as a novel indicator of liver cell function and short-term mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis and liver cancer

L. Kalabay, Lajos Jakab, Z. Prohászka, G. Füst, Zsuzsa Benkö, L. Telegdy, Zsolt Lörincz, P. Závodszky, Philippe Arnaud, B. Fekete

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Abstract

Objective: Human fetuin/α2HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) is synthesized by hepatocytes. We intended to determine whether liver dysfunction or acute phase reaction is dominant in the regulation of its serum concentrations and to see if decreased AHGS levels are associated with short-term mortality. Design: We determined the serum AHSG levels in patients with acute alcoholic, acute A, B, and Epstein-Barr virus hepatitis, alcoholic cirrhosis, and hepatocellular cancer and correlated them to conventional laboratory parameters of inflammation and liver function. Patients were followed for 1 month. Methods: Serum AHSG was determined by radial immunodiffusion. Results: Compared to controls, significantly lower AHSG levels were found in patients with liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer but not the acute viral hepatitides. Strong positive correlation with serum transferrin, albumin and prothrombin was found. Febrile episodes were not associated with significantly decreased AHSG levels. Concentrations below 300 μg/ml were associated with high mortality rate (52.00%; relative risk, 5.497; 95% confidence interval, 2.472-12.23; P <0.0001). Of all laboratory parameters studied serum AHSG levels showed the greatest difference between deceased and survived patients with cirrhosis and cancer. Moreover, other acute phase reactants did not differ significantly. The multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the decrease of serum AHSG is independent of all other variables that were found decreased in deceased patients. Conclusions: Decreased serum AHSG concentration is due rather to hepatocellular dysfunction than the acute phase reaction and is an outstanding predictor of short-term mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis and liver cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)389-394
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Fetuins
Liver Neoplasms
Liver Cirrhosis
Glycoproteins
Mortality
Liver
Serum
Acute-Phase Reaction
Hepatitis
Alcoholic Liver Cirrhosis
Acute-Phase Proteins
Immunodiffusion
Prothrombin
Transferrin
Human Herpesvirus 4
Serum Albumin
Liver Diseases
Hepatocytes
Fibrosis
Fever

Keywords

  • Acute phase reaction
  • Acute viral hepatitis
  • Fetuin/α2HS-glycoprotein
  • Liver cancer
  • Liver cirrhosis
  • Transferrin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

@article{502d14aee53743db8e6c948197e02751,
title = "Human fetuin/α2HS-glycoprotein level as a novel indicator of liver cell function and short-term mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis and liver cancer",
abstract = "Objective: Human fetuin/α2HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) is synthesized by hepatocytes. We intended to determine whether liver dysfunction or acute phase reaction is dominant in the regulation of its serum concentrations and to see if decreased AHGS levels are associated with short-term mortality. Design: We determined the serum AHSG levels in patients with acute alcoholic, acute A, B, and Epstein-Barr virus hepatitis, alcoholic cirrhosis, and hepatocellular cancer and correlated them to conventional laboratory parameters of inflammation and liver function. Patients were followed for 1 month. Methods: Serum AHSG was determined by radial immunodiffusion. Results: Compared to controls, significantly lower AHSG levels were found in patients with liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer but not the acute viral hepatitides. Strong positive correlation with serum transferrin, albumin and prothrombin was found. Febrile episodes were not associated with significantly decreased AHSG levels. Concentrations below 300 μg/ml were associated with high mortality rate (52.00{\%}; relative risk, 5.497; 95{\%} confidence interval, 2.472-12.23; P <0.0001). Of all laboratory parameters studied serum AHSG levels showed the greatest difference between deceased and survived patients with cirrhosis and cancer. Moreover, other acute phase reactants did not differ significantly. The multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the decrease of serum AHSG is independent of all other variables that were found decreased in deceased patients. Conclusions: Decreased serum AHSG concentration is due rather to hepatocellular dysfunction than the acute phase reaction and is an outstanding predictor of short-term mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis and liver cancer.",
keywords = "Acute phase reaction, Acute viral hepatitis, Fetuin/α2HS-glycoprotein, Liver cancer, Liver cirrhosis, Transferrin",
author = "L. Kalabay and Lajos Jakab and Z. Proh{\'a}szka and G. F{\"u}st and Zsuzsa Benk{\"o} and L. Telegdy and Zsolt L{\"o}rincz and P. Z{\'a}vodszky and Philippe Arnaud and B. Fekete",
year = "2002",
doi = "10.1097/00042737-200204000-00009",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "389--394",
journal = "European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology",
issn = "0954-691X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Human fetuin/α2HS-glycoprotein level as a novel indicator of liver cell function and short-term mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis and liver cancer

AU - Kalabay, L.

AU - Jakab, Lajos

AU - Prohászka, Z.

AU - Füst, G.

AU - Benkö, Zsuzsa

AU - Telegdy, L.

AU - Lörincz, Zsolt

AU - Závodszky, P.

AU - Arnaud, Philippe

AU - Fekete, B.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Objective: Human fetuin/α2HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) is synthesized by hepatocytes. We intended to determine whether liver dysfunction or acute phase reaction is dominant in the regulation of its serum concentrations and to see if decreased AHGS levels are associated with short-term mortality. Design: We determined the serum AHSG levels in patients with acute alcoholic, acute A, B, and Epstein-Barr virus hepatitis, alcoholic cirrhosis, and hepatocellular cancer and correlated them to conventional laboratory parameters of inflammation and liver function. Patients were followed for 1 month. Methods: Serum AHSG was determined by radial immunodiffusion. Results: Compared to controls, significantly lower AHSG levels were found in patients with liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer but not the acute viral hepatitides. Strong positive correlation with serum transferrin, albumin and prothrombin was found. Febrile episodes were not associated with significantly decreased AHSG levels. Concentrations below 300 μg/ml were associated with high mortality rate (52.00%; relative risk, 5.497; 95% confidence interval, 2.472-12.23; P <0.0001). Of all laboratory parameters studied serum AHSG levels showed the greatest difference between deceased and survived patients with cirrhosis and cancer. Moreover, other acute phase reactants did not differ significantly. The multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the decrease of serum AHSG is independent of all other variables that were found decreased in deceased patients. Conclusions: Decreased serum AHSG concentration is due rather to hepatocellular dysfunction than the acute phase reaction and is an outstanding predictor of short-term mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis and liver cancer.

AB - Objective: Human fetuin/α2HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) is synthesized by hepatocytes. We intended to determine whether liver dysfunction or acute phase reaction is dominant in the regulation of its serum concentrations and to see if decreased AHGS levels are associated with short-term mortality. Design: We determined the serum AHSG levels in patients with acute alcoholic, acute A, B, and Epstein-Barr virus hepatitis, alcoholic cirrhosis, and hepatocellular cancer and correlated them to conventional laboratory parameters of inflammation and liver function. Patients were followed for 1 month. Methods: Serum AHSG was determined by radial immunodiffusion. Results: Compared to controls, significantly lower AHSG levels were found in patients with liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer but not the acute viral hepatitides. Strong positive correlation with serum transferrin, albumin and prothrombin was found. Febrile episodes were not associated with significantly decreased AHSG levels. Concentrations below 300 μg/ml were associated with high mortality rate (52.00%; relative risk, 5.497; 95% confidence interval, 2.472-12.23; P <0.0001). Of all laboratory parameters studied serum AHSG levels showed the greatest difference between deceased and survived patients with cirrhosis and cancer. Moreover, other acute phase reactants did not differ significantly. The multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the decrease of serum AHSG is independent of all other variables that were found decreased in deceased patients. Conclusions: Decreased serum AHSG concentration is due rather to hepatocellular dysfunction than the acute phase reaction and is an outstanding predictor of short-term mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis and liver cancer.

KW - Acute phase reaction

KW - Acute viral hepatitis

KW - Fetuin/α2HS-glycoprotein

KW - Liver cancer

KW - Liver cirrhosis

KW - Transferrin

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U2 - 10.1097/00042737-200204000-00009

DO - 10.1097/00042737-200204000-00009

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 389

EP - 394

JO - European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology

JF - European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology

SN - 0954-691X

IS - 4

ER -