Human effects on ecological connectivity in aquatic ecosystems

Integrating scientific approaches to support management and mitigation

David A. Crook, Winsor H. Lowe, Frederick W. Allendorf, T. Erős, Debra S. Finn, Bronwyn M. Gillanders, Wade L. Hadwen, Chris Harrod, Virgilio Hermoso, Simon Jennings, Raouf W. Kilada, Ivan Nagelkerken, Michael M. Hansen, Timothy J. Page, Cynthia Riginos, Brian Fry, Jane M. Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding the drivers and implications of anthropogenic disturbance of ecological connectivity is a key concern for the conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem processes. Here, we review human activities that affect the movements and dispersal of aquatic organisms, including damming of rivers, river regulation, habitat loss and alteration, human-assisted dispersal of organisms and climate change. Using a series of case studies, we show that the insight needed to understand the nature and implications of connectivity, and to underpin conservation and management, is best achieved via data synthesis from multiple analytical approaches. We identify four key knowledge requirements for progressing our understanding of the effects of anthropogenic impacts on ecological connectivity: autecology; population structure; movement characteristics; and environmental tolerance/phenotypic plasticity. Structuring empirical research around these four broad data requirements, and using this information to parameterise appropriate models and develop management approaches, will allow for mitigation of the effects of anthropogenic disturbance on ecological connectivity in aquatic ecosystems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)52-64
Number of pages13
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume534
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 15 2015

Fingerprint

Aquatic ecosystems
aquatic ecosystem
connectivity
Conservation
mitigation
Rivers
Aquatic organisms
Biodiversity
Climate change
Ecosystems
Plasticity
autecology
disturbance
phenotypic plasticity
habitat loss
aquatic organism
river
population structure
human activity
tolerance

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Dispersal
  • Fragmentation
  • Meta-population
  • Migration
  • Source-sink

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Environmental Engineering

Cite this

Human effects on ecological connectivity in aquatic ecosystems : Integrating scientific approaches to support management and mitigation. / Crook, David A.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Allendorf, Frederick W.; Erős, T.; Finn, Debra S.; Gillanders, Bronwyn M.; Hadwen, Wade L.; Harrod, Chris; Hermoso, Virgilio; Jennings, Simon; Kilada, Raouf W.; Nagelkerken, Ivan; Hansen, Michael M.; Page, Timothy J.; Riginos, Cynthia; Fry, Brian; Hughes, Jane M.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 534, 15.11.2015, p. 52-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crook, DA, Lowe, WH, Allendorf, FW, Erős, T, Finn, DS, Gillanders, BM, Hadwen, WL, Harrod, C, Hermoso, V, Jennings, S, Kilada, RW, Nagelkerken, I, Hansen, MM, Page, TJ, Riginos, C, Fry, B & Hughes, JM 2015, 'Human effects on ecological connectivity in aquatic ecosystems: Integrating scientific approaches to support management and mitigation', Science of the Total Environment, vol. 534, pp. 52-64. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.04.034
Crook, David A. ; Lowe, Winsor H. ; Allendorf, Frederick W. ; Erős, T. ; Finn, Debra S. ; Gillanders, Bronwyn M. ; Hadwen, Wade L. ; Harrod, Chris ; Hermoso, Virgilio ; Jennings, Simon ; Kilada, Raouf W. ; Nagelkerken, Ivan ; Hansen, Michael M. ; Page, Timothy J. ; Riginos, Cynthia ; Fry, Brian ; Hughes, Jane M. / Human effects on ecological connectivity in aquatic ecosystems : Integrating scientific approaches to support management and mitigation. In: Science of the Total Environment. 2015 ; Vol. 534. pp. 52-64.
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