Human bocavirus and rhino-enteroviruses in childhood otitis media with effusion

Szilárd Rezes, Maria Söderlund-Venermo, Merja Roivainen, Kaisa Kemppainen, Zsolt Szabó, I. Sziklai, Anne Pitkäranta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Viral respiratory infections play an important role in the pathogenesis of otitis media with effusion (OME) in children. The most common human rhinoviruses (HRVs) have been detected in middle ear effusions (MEE), but there is only limited data available about the closely related human enteroviruses (HEVs). The newly discovered human bocavirus (HBoV) has not, however, been identified in MEE of OME children. Objectives: The aim of our study was to determine the presence of HBoV and HRV/HEV and the rate of coinfection in a set of MEE samples collected from OME children. Study design: Seventy-five MEE samples from 54 children with no acute respiratory symptoms were studied with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of HRV/HEV and quantitative PCR for detection of HBoV. Results: Twenty-six (35%) of 75 MEE samples were positive for viral nucleic acid, 22 (29%) for HEV, 10 (13%) for HRV and 2 (3%) for HBoV. There was no statistically significant difference between mucoid and serous effusions in the rate of virus detection. Forty-three percent of bilateral cases showed a contra-lateral difference in viral finding. Conclusions: Our results suggest that these common respiratory viruses can be associated with OME in children. Whether these viruses are causative etiologic factors of MEE persistence or merely remnants of previous infections is not known.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)234-237
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Virology
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2009

Fingerprint

Human bocavirus
Otitis Media with Effusion
Enterovirus
Rhinovirus
Viruses
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Virus Diseases
Coinfection
Respiratory Tract Infections
Nucleic Acids
Reverse Transcription

Keywords

  • Enterovirus
  • Human bocavirus
  • Otitis media with effusion
  • Rhinovirus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Rezes, S., Söderlund-Venermo, M., Roivainen, M., Kemppainen, K., Szabó, Z., Sziklai, I., & Pitkäranta, A. (2009). Human bocavirus and rhino-enteroviruses in childhood otitis media with effusion. Journal of Clinical Virology, 46(3), 234-237. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2009.08.010

Human bocavirus and rhino-enteroviruses in childhood otitis media with effusion. / Rezes, Szilárd; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Roivainen, Merja; Kemppainen, Kaisa; Szabó, Zsolt; Sziklai, I.; Pitkäranta, Anne.

In: Journal of Clinical Virology, Vol. 46, No. 3, 11.2009, p. 234-237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rezes, S, Söderlund-Venermo, M, Roivainen, M, Kemppainen, K, Szabó, Z, Sziklai, I & Pitkäranta, A 2009, 'Human bocavirus and rhino-enteroviruses in childhood otitis media with effusion', Journal of Clinical Virology, vol. 46, no. 3, pp. 234-237. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2009.08.010
Rezes, Szilárd ; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria ; Roivainen, Merja ; Kemppainen, Kaisa ; Szabó, Zsolt ; Sziklai, I. ; Pitkäranta, Anne. / Human bocavirus and rhino-enteroviruses in childhood otitis media with effusion. In: Journal of Clinical Virology. 2009 ; Vol. 46, No. 3. pp. 234-237.
@article{c0c511b3323b4219b98c9dab4e326c74,
title = "Human bocavirus and rhino-enteroviruses in childhood otitis media with effusion",
abstract = "Background: Viral respiratory infections play an important role in the pathogenesis of otitis media with effusion (OME) in children. The most common human rhinoviruses (HRVs) have been detected in middle ear effusions (MEE), but there is only limited data available about the closely related human enteroviruses (HEVs). The newly discovered human bocavirus (HBoV) has not, however, been identified in MEE of OME children. Objectives: The aim of our study was to determine the presence of HBoV and HRV/HEV and the rate of coinfection in a set of MEE samples collected from OME children. Study design: Seventy-five MEE samples from 54 children with no acute respiratory symptoms were studied with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of HRV/HEV and quantitative PCR for detection of HBoV. Results: Twenty-six (35{\%}) of 75 MEE samples were positive for viral nucleic acid, 22 (29{\%}) for HEV, 10 (13{\%}) for HRV and 2 (3{\%}) for HBoV. There was no statistically significant difference between mucoid and serous effusions in the rate of virus detection. Forty-three percent of bilateral cases showed a contra-lateral difference in viral finding. Conclusions: Our results suggest that these common respiratory viruses can be associated with OME in children. Whether these viruses are causative etiologic factors of MEE persistence or merely remnants of previous infections is not known.",
keywords = "Enterovirus, Human bocavirus, Otitis media with effusion, Rhinovirus",
author = "Szil{\'a}rd Rezes and Maria S{\"o}derlund-Venermo and Merja Roivainen and Kaisa Kemppainen and Zsolt Szab{\'o} and I. Sziklai and Anne Pitk{\"a}ranta",
year = "2009",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.jcv.2009.08.010",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "234--237",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Virology",
issn = "1386-6532",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Human bocavirus and rhino-enteroviruses in childhood otitis media with effusion

AU - Rezes, Szilárd

AU - Söderlund-Venermo, Maria

AU - Roivainen, Merja

AU - Kemppainen, Kaisa

AU - Szabó, Zsolt

AU - Sziklai, I.

AU - Pitkäranta, Anne

PY - 2009/11

Y1 - 2009/11

N2 - Background: Viral respiratory infections play an important role in the pathogenesis of otitis media with effusion (OME) in children. The most common human rhinoviruses (HRVs) have been detected in middle ear effusions (MEE), but there is only limited data available about the closely related human enteroviruses (HEVs). The newly discovered human bocavirus (HBoV) has not, however, been identified in MEE of OME children. Objectives: The aim of our study was to determine the presence of HBoV and HRV/HEV and the rate of coinfection in a set of MEE samples collected from OME children. Study design: Seventy-five MEE samples from 54 children with no acute respiratory symptoms were studied with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of HRV/HEV and quantitative PCR for detection of HBoV. Results: Twenty-six (35%) of 75 MEE samples were positive for viral nucleic acid, 22 (29%) for HEV, 10 (13%) for HRV and 2 (3%) for HBoV. There was no statistically significant difference between mucoid and serous effusions in the rate of virus detection. Forty-three percent of bilateral cases showed a contra-lateral difference in viral finding. Conclusions: Our results suggest that these common respiratory viruses can be associated with OME in children. Whether these viruses are causative etiologic factors of MEE persistence or merely remnants of previous infections is not known.

AB - Background: Viral respiratory infections play an important role in the pathogenesis of otitis media with effusion (OME) in children. The most common human rhinoviruses (HRVs) have been detected in middle ear effusions (MEE), but there is only limited data available about the closely related human enteroviruses (HEVs). The newly discovered human bocavirus (HBoV) has not, however, been identified in MEE of OME children. Objectives: The aim of our study was to determine the presence of HBoV and HRV/HEV and the rate of coinfection in a set of MEE samples collected from OME children. Study design: Seventy-five MEE samples from 54 children with no acute respiratory symptoms were studied with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of HRV/HEV and quantitative PCR for detection of HBoV. Results: Twenty-six (35%) of 75 MEE samples were positive for viral nucleic acid, 22 (29%) for HEV, 10 (13%) for HRV and 2 (3%) for HBoV. There was no statistically significant difference between mucoid and serous effusions in the rate of virus detection. Forty-three percent of bilateral cases showed a contra-lateral difference in viral finding. Conclusions: Our results suggest that these common respiratory viruses can be associated with OME in children. Whether these viruses are causative etiologic factors of MEE persistence or merely remnants of previous infections is not known.

KW - Enterovirus

KW - Human bocavirus

KW - Otitis media with effusion

KW - Rhinovirus

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=72049105572&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=72049105572&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jcv.2009.08.010

DO - 10.1016/j.jcv.2009.08.010

M3 - Article

VL - 46

SP - 234

EP - 237

JO - Journal of Clinical Virology

JF - Journal of Clinical Virology

SN - 1386-6532

IS - 3

ER -