How well do patients with schizophrenia track multiple moving targets?

O. Kelemen, Orsolya Nagy, Adrienne Mátyássy, I. Bitter, G. Benedek, Z. Vidnyánszky, S. Kéri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has been demonstrated that patients with schizophrenia perform poorly on tasks that require orienting, focusing, maintaining, and shifting attention. However, it is unknown how patients with schizophrenia can track multiple moving targets. To elucidate this issue, the authors investigated fast and slow multiple-object tracking in patients with schizophrenia (n = 30) and in matched healthy control participants (n = 30) and assessed their relationship with motion perception (velocity discrimination), sustained attention and context processing (Continuous Performance Test, 1-9 version; J. R. Finkelstein, T. D. Cannon, R. E. Gur, R. C. Gur, & P. Moberg, 1997), and object and spatial working memory. Results revealed that patients with schizophrenia displayed impaired performances on multiple-object tracking tasks. Linear regression analysis revealed a specific relationship among object tracking, velocity discrimination, and spatial working memory. In patients with schizophrenia, velocity discrimination and spatial working memory were the predictive factors of multiple-object tracking, whereas in healthy control participants, the single predictive factor was velocity discrimination. Probabilistic regression analysis revealed that only the Continuous Performance Test made significant contribution to discriminating between patients and control participants. These results suggest that multiple-object tracking is impaired in schizophrenia, and that it is specifically associated with motion perception and spatial working memory.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)319-325
Number of pages7
JournalNeuropsychology
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2007

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Schizophrenia
Short-Term Memory
Motion Perception
Healthy Volunteers
Patient Identification Systems
Regression Analysis
Linear Models
Spatial Memory
Discrimination (Psychology)
Gur

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Motion perception
  • Multiple-object tracking
  • Schizophrenia
  • Working memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

How well do patients with schizophrenia track multiple moving targets? / Kelemen, O.; Nagy, Orsolya; Mátyássy, Adrienne; Bitter, I.; Benedek, G.; Vidnyánszky, Z.; Kéri, S.

In: Neuropsychology, Vol. 21, No. 3, 05.2007, p. 319-325.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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