Hospitalisations and surgery in Crohn's disease

Charles N. Bernstein, Edward V. Loftus, Siew C. Ng, P. Lakatos, Bjorn Moum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

144 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hospitalisation and surgery are considered to be markers of more severe disease in Crohn's disease. These are costly events and limiting these costs has emerged as one rationale for the cost of expensive biologic therapies. The authors sought to review the most recent international literature to estimate current hospitalisation and surgery rates for Crohn's disease and place them in the historical context of where they have been, whether they have changed over time, and to compare these rates across different jurisdictions. It is in this context that the authors could set the stage for interpreting some of the early data and studies that will be forthcoming on rates of hospitalisation and surgery in an era of more aggressive biologic therapy. The most recent data from Canada, the United Kingdom and Hungary all suggest that surgical rates were falling prior to the advent of biologic therapy, and continue to fall during this treatment era. The impact of biologic therapy on surgical rates will have to be analysed in the context of evolving reductions in developed regions before biologic therapy was even introduced. Whether more aggressive medical therapy will decrease the requirement for surgery over long periods of time remains to be proven.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)622-629
Number of pages8
JournalGut
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2012

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Biological Therapy
Crohn Disease
Hospitalization
Costs and Cost Analysis
Hungary
Canada
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Bernstein, C. N., Loftus, E. V., Ng, S. C., Lakatos, P., & Moum, B. (2012). Hospitalisations and surgery in Crohn's disease. Gut, 61(4), 622-629. https://doi.org/10.1136/gutjnl-2011-301397

Hospitalisations and surgery in Crohn's disease. / Bernstein, Charles N.; Loftus, Edward V.; Ng, Siew C.; Lakatos, P.; Moum, Bjorn.

In: Gut, Vol. 61, No. 4, 04.2012, p. 622-629.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bernstein, CN, Loftus, EV, Ng, SC, Lakatos, P & Moum, B 2012, 'Hospitalisations and surgery in Crohn's disease', Gut, vol. 61, no. 4, pp. 622-629. https://doi.org/10.1136/gutjnl-2011-301397
Bernstein, Charles N. ; Loftus, Edward V. ; Ng, Siew C. ; Lakatos, P. ; Moum, Bjorn. / Hospitalisations and surgery in Crohn's disease. In: Gut. 2012 ; Vol. 61, No. 4. pp. 622-629.
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