Holocene lacustrine carbonate formation

Old ideas in the light of new radiocarbon data from a single site in central Hungary

M. Jenei, S. Gulyás, P. Sümegi, M. Molnár

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lacustrine carbonate deposition in Hungary has been traditionally interpreted as the outcome of the dry, hot climate prevailing between 7500 and 5000 14C yr BP (hereafter BP) (~6400 and 3800 BC), triggering the partial desiccation of minor ponds and lakes. A comparative analysis of 5 14C results from the site of Csólyospálos, central Hungary, with those of other Hungarian lacustrine carbonates yielded stunning new results. According to these new dates, carbonate deposition must have initiated much earlier, possibly around 10,000-11,000 BP (9500-11,000 BC) in the Carpathian Basin. Furthermore, the formation of lacustrine carbonates must have come to an end at very different times in different parts of the basin, contrasting previous views on the uniform and synchronous cessation of lacustrine carbonate formation in Hungary. According to the newest results presented here, carbonate deposition in the southern and southeastern parts of the basin ceased around 6000 BP (~4900 BC). Meanwhile, in the central parts, deposition continued as long as the terminal Bronze Age (~1300 BC).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1017-1021
Number of pages5
JournalRadiocarbon
Volume49
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2007

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Holocene
carbonate
basin
Bronze Age
desiccation
Hungary
Radiocarbon
Carbonate
pond
Deposition
lake
climate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Holocene lacustrine carbonate formation : Old ideas in the light of new radiocarbon data from a single site in central Hungary. / Jenei, M.; Gulyás, S.; Sümegi, P.; Molnár, M.

In: Radiocarbon, Vol. 49, No. 2, 11.2007, p. 1017-1021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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