Histopathological observations on vestibular schwannomas after Gamma Knife radiosurgery: The Marseille experience

G. Szeifert, D. Figarella-Branger, P. H. Roche, J. Régis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and purpose. - Radiosurgery has become a successful treatment modality in the management of vestibular schwannomas (VS) during the past four decades. Although the number of treated cases has been increasing continuously we know relatively little about the pathological effect of high dose irradiation on VS following radiosurgery. The purpose of this study was to analyze histopathological changes in VS after Leksell Gamma Knife (LGK) radiosurgery. Methods. - Out of a series of 1350 VS cases treated with LGK surgery 22 patients underwent craniotomy for tumor removal in 6-92 months interval after radiosurgery. Surgical pathology material was available in 17 cases. Routine histological and immunohistochemical investigations were performed on the tissue samples. Histopathological findings were compared with clinical and radiological follow-up data. Results. - Coagulation necrosis in the central part of the schwannomas surrounded with a transitional zone containing loosened tissue structure of shrunken tumor cells covered with an outer capsule of vigorous neoplastic cells was the basic histopathological lesion. Granulation tissue proliferation with inflammatory cell infiltration, different extent of hemorrhages and scar tissue development was usually present. Endothelial destruction or wall damage of vascular channels was a common finding. Analyzing the follow-up data it turned out that 7 patients out of the 22 were operated on because of radiological progression only without clinical deterioration and 4 of them was removed during the latency period after radiosurgery. Conclusion. - Results of the present histopathological study suggest that radiosurgery works with double effect on VS: it seems to destroy directly tumor cells (with necrosis or inducing apoptosis), and causes vascular damages as well. The loss of central contrast enhancement on CT and MR images following radiosurgery might be consequence of necrosis and vascular impairment. From clinical-pathological point of view we think that patients should not undergo craniotomy just because of radiological progression of the tumor without clinical deterioration, mainly in the latency period. This requires consultation and common decision-making between the radiosurgical and the microsurgical team.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)327-337
Number of pages11
JournalNeurochirurgie
Volume50
Issue number2-3 II
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2004

Fingerprint

Acoustic Neuroma
Radiosurgery
Blood Vessels
Necrosis
Craniotomy
Neoplasms
Surgical Pathology
Granulation Tissue
Neurilemmoma
Capsules
Cicatrix
Decision Making
Referral and Consultation
Apoptosis
Hemorrhage

Keywords

  • Gamma Knife radiosurgery
  • Histopathology
  • Vestibular schwannoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Histopathological observations on vestibular schwannomas after Gamma Knife radiosurgery : The Marseille experience. / Szeifert, G.; Figarella-Branger, D.; Roche, P. H.; Régis, J.

In: Neurochirurgie, Vol. 50, No. 2-3 II, 06.2004, p. 327-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Szeifert, G. ; Figarella-Branger, D. ; Roche, P. H. ; Régis, J. / Histopathological observations on vestibular schwannomas after Gamma Knife radiosurgery : The Marseille experience. In: Neurochirurgie. 2004 ; Vol. 50, No. 2-3 II. pp. 327-337.
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