Histopathological and immunocytochemical demonstration of retinal degeneration in the squirrel monkey

Karin Warfvinge, A. Szél, Anitha Bruun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Here we describe the spontaneous appearance of a retinal degeneration in two squirrel monkeys (New World monkey). Since the retinal pathology sufficiently resembles that seen in human degenerative disorder, studies of degeneration in monkeys could contribute to the prevention and treatment of the human disorder. The histopathological examination of horizontal sections comprising the optic disc and the fovea revealed photoreceptor outer and inner segments only in the central fovea. The morphology of the photoreceptors and outer nuclear layer changed rapidly away from the central fovea. There was a loss of outer segments, a shortening of inner segments and disorganized and flattened cells were found in the outer nuclear layer. AO labelling not only detected opsin in the few areas where outer segments were present, but also in the inner segments and the outer nuclear layer. The OS-2 antibody failed to stain the outer segments of the blue sensitive cones. The COS-1 antibody stained many red/green sensitive cones in the fovea, but their density decreased quickly outside this region. Thus, we have detected retinal degeneration in two outbred squirrel monkeys who were being examined for other reasons unrelated to research in retinal degeneration. One was feral and the other was only two generations removed from the feral state. The identification of retinal degeneration in a non-human primate holds great promise for the development of a treatment for human retinitis pigmentosa because access to a primate model would be of invaluable importance for studying the biochemistry behind these disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)245-253
Number of pages9
JournalExperimental Eye Research
Volume63
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1996

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Saimiri
Retinal Degeneration
Primates
Platyrrhini
Opsins
Retinitis Pigmentosa
Antibodies
Optic Disk
Biochemistry
Haplorhini
Coloring Agents
Pathology
Research
feral

Keywords

  • anti-opsin
  • color-specific cones
  • photoreceptor degeneration
  • pigment epithelium
  • squirrel monkey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Histopathological and immunocytochemical demonstration of retinal degeneration in the squirrel monkey. / Warfvinge, Karin; Szél, A.; Bruun, Anitha.

In: Experimental Eye Research, Vol. 63, No. 3, 09.1996, p. 245-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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