Hippocampal function and putative corticosterone receptors: Effect of septal lesions

C. Nyakas, E. R. De Kloet, B. Bonus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to investigate the relation between septohippocampal function and hippocampal corticosterone (B) receptors, discrete septal areas were destroyed by electrolytic lesions; the effects of the lesions on cytosol receptor binding of B in the hippocampus were determined 10 or 30 days after lesioning in male rats adrenalectomized 12 h prior to sacrifice. The septal lesions were also characterized functionally by endocrine, neurophysiological and behavioral parameters in the same group of animals. Hippocampal B receptor activity was increased 30 days after lesioning the lateral septal area. The same lesions impaired the acquisition of a conditioned avoidance response. The increase was not due to a behavioral deficiency per se as lesions in the parafascicular nucleus did impair acquisition behavior without affecting B receptors. There was no change in B receptor activity 30 days after destruction of the medial septal nucleus, although such a lesion completely abolished the hippocampal theta activity measured at 10 days. In another group of animals hippocampal B receptors were not affected at 10 days after any of the lesions, while a transient increase in basal plasma levels of B was noted at that time. It appears that the hippocampal receptor activity for B depends on the integrity of the efferents from the hippocampus and/or the dorsolateral septal B receptor system rather than on the septal afferents to the hippocampus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)301-312
Number of pages12
JournalNeuroendocrinology
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1979

Fingerprint

Septum of Brain
Hippocampus
Intralaminar Thalamic Nuclei
Septal Nuclei
Cytosol
corticosterone receptor

Keywords

  • Avoidance behavior
  • Corticosterone receptors
  • Hippocampal functions
  • Plasma corticosterone
  • Septal lesions
  • Theta activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Hippocampal function and putative corticosterone receptors : Effect of septal lesions. / Nyakas, C.; De Kloet, E. R.; Bonus, B.

In: Neuroendocrinology, Vol. 29, No. 5, 1979, p. 301-312.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nyakas, C. ; De Kloet, E. R. ; Bonus, B. / Hippocampal function and putative corticosterone receptors : Effect of septal lesions. In: Neuroendocrinology. 1979 ; Vol. 29, No. 5. pp. 301-312.
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