Higher risk of orofacial clefts in children born to mothers with angina pectoris: A population-based case-control study

E. Czeizel, Attila Vereczkey, F. Bánhidy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Previously an unexpected association of maternal angina pectoris (MAP) during pregnancy with a higher risk of orofacial clefts in their children was found. There were three objectives of this study: (i) to evaluate the validity of MAP-diagnoses in the previous study and the recent history of mothers with MAP in a follow-up study; (ii) to estimate the prevalence of other congenital abnormalities in the offspring of mothers with MAP; and (iii) to analyze the possible effect of confounders for the risk of orofacial clefts. The large dataset of population-based Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance System of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-1996 was evaluated including 22843 cases with congenital abnormalities and 38151 controls without any defect. Twenty-two cases (0.10%) and 12 controls (0.03%) were born to mothers with medically recorded MAP (odds ratio [OR] with 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.7, 1.8-7.3). Of 22 cases, six had isolated cleft lip±palate (OR with 95% CI: 13.3, 4.9-35.9) and two were affected with isolated cleft palate (OR with 95% CI: 10.5, 2.3-47.6). The diagnosis of MAP was confirmed in seven women visited at home in 2009-2010, two had recent myocardial infarction and five were smokers. There was no higher risk for other congenital abnormalities. In conclusion the higher risk of orofacial clefts was confirmed in the children of mothers with MAP and smoking may trigger the genetic predisposition of both MAP and orofacial clefts. However, the number of cases was limited and therefore further studies are needed to confirm or reject this theoretically and practically important observation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-54
Number of pages6
JournalCongenital Anomalies
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2015

Fingerprint

Angina Pectoris
Case-Control Studies
Mothers
Population
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Cleft Palate
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Smoking
History
Myocardial Infarction
Observation

Keywords

  • Angina pectoris
  • Case-control study
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Orofacial cleft

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Embryology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Higher risk of orofacial clefts in children born to mothers with angina pectoris : A population-based case-control study. / Czeizel, E.; Vereczkey, Attila; Bánhidy, F.

In: Congenital Anomalies, Vol. 55, No. 1, 01.02.2015, p. 49-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Previously an unexpected association of maternal angina pectoris (MAP) during pregnancy with a higher risk of orofacial clefts in their children was found. There were three objectives of this study: (i) to evaluate the validity of MAP-diagnoses in the previous study and the recent history of mothers with MAP in a follow-up study; (ii) to estimate the prevalence of other congenital abnormalities in the offspring of mothers with MAP; and (iii) to analyze the possible effect of confounders for the risk of orofacial clefts. The large dataset of population-based Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance System of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-1996 was evaluated including 22843 cases with congenital abnormalities and 38151 controls without any defect. Twenty-two cases (0.10{\%}) and 12 controls (0.03{\%}) were born to mothers with medically recorded MAP (odds ratio [OR] with 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 3.7, 1.8-7.3). Of 22 cases, six had isolated cleft lip±palate (OR with 95{\%} CI: 13.3, 4.9-35.9) and two were affected with isolated cleft palate (OR with 95{\%} CI: 10.5, 2.3-47.6). The diagnosis of MAP was confirmed in seven women visited at home in 2009-2010, two had recent myocardial infarction and five were smokers. There was no higher risk for other congenital abnormalities. In conclusion the higher risk of orofacial clefts was confirmed in the children of mothers with MAP and smoking may trigger the genetic predisposition of both MAP and orofacial clefts. However, the number of cases was limited and therefore further studies are needed to confirm or reject this theoretically and practically important observation.",
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