High-performance capillary electrophoresis of SDS-protein complexes using UV-transparent polymer networks

Katalin Ganzler, K. S. Greve, A. S. Cohen, B. L. Karger, Andras Guttman, N. C. Cooke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

This paper demonstrates the use of UV-transparent replaceable polymer networks for the separation of SDS-proteln complexes on the basis of molecular weight. First, the use of linear (i.e. non-cross-linked) polyacrylamide is shown to provide molecular separation of SDS-protein complexes. A study reveals such columns to yield significantly greater lifetime than cross-linked gels because of the flexibility of the noncovalently attached polymer chains. However, column lifetime was still found to be limited (∼20-40 injections), and detection at 214 ran was problematical because of the absorbance of polyacrylamide. UV-transparent polymer networks of dextran and PEG were substituted for polyacrylamide with successful molecular weight sieving of SDS-proteln complexes at 214 nm. Due to their low to moderate viscosities, these networks could be routinely replaced leading to the possibility of hundreds of injections with a single column. Migration time reproducibilities of 0.5% RSD or less were found with replacement of the network. Using dextran, calibration plots of peak area vs concentration of standard protein were linear over the range of 0.5 μg/mL up to at least 0.25 mg/mL. Furthermore, plasma samples could be directly utilized because of the strong solvating power of SDS. Rapid separation of protein mixtures are demonstrated with these UV-transparent polymer networks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2665-2671
Number of pages7
JournalAnalytical Chemistry
Volume64
Issue number22
Publication statusPublished - Nov 15 1992

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Capillary electrophoresis
Polymers
Dextrans
Proteins
Molecular weight
Polyethylene glycols
Gels
Calibration
Viscosity
Plasmas
polyacrylamide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry

Cite this

Ganzler, K., Greve, K. S., Cohen, A. S., Karger, B. L., Guttman, A., & Cooke, N. C. (1992). High-performance capillary electrophoresis of SDS-protein complexes using UV-transparent polymer networks. Analytical Chemistry, 64(22), 2665-2671.

High-performance capillary electrophoresis of SDS-protein complexes using UV-transparent polymer networks. / Ganzler, Katalin; Greve, K. S.; Cohen, A. S.; Karger, B. L.; Guttman, Andras; Cooke, N. C.

In: Analytical Chemistry, Vol. 64, No. 22, 15.11.1992, p. 2665-2671.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ganzler, K, Greve, KS, Cohen, AS, Karger, BL, Guttman, A & Cooke, NC 1992, 'High-performance capillary electrophoresis of SDS-protein complexes using UV-transparent polymer networks', Analytical Chemistry, vol. 64, no. 22, pp. 2665-2671.
Ganzler, Katalin ; Greve, K. S. ; Cohen, A. S. ; Karger, B. L. ; Guttman, Andras ; Cooke, N. C. / High-performance capillary electrophoresis of SDS-protein complexes using UV-transparent polymer networks. In: Analytical Chemistry. 1992 ; Vol. 64, No. 22. pp. 2665-2671.
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