A kutya hepatozoonosisa Európában és Magyarországon: Irodalmi áttekintés

Translated title of the contribution: Hepatozoonosis of dogs in Europe and in Hungary. Literature review

S. Hornok, Farkas Viola, Horváth Gábor, Kálmán Imre, Kovács Tibor, Tóth Ferenc, Tánczos Balázs, R. Farkas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hepatozoon spp. are unicellular, apicomplexan parasites that may affect vertebrates as hosts and are transmitted by blood sucking arthropod vectors. Hepatozoon canis is responsible for canine hepatozoonosis in Europe. It infects mainly haemolymphatic tissues of dogs. Although this condition may frequently be asymptomatic, it can also result in severe, eventually fatal debilitating disease with anaemia, lethargy and cachexia. An important aspect of the life cycle of H. canis is that the tick vector cannot inoculate sporozoites during blood feeding; therefore it has to be eaten by the dog for the infection to establish. The geographical distribution of H. canis in Europe was formerly thought to be restricted to southern, Mediterranean and Balkan countries, where its main vector, Rhipicephalus sanguineus is known to occur. In other parts of the continent canine hepatozoonosis used to be diagnosed seldom, and mostly in dogs with a history of traveling to the south. However, recently, Hepatozoon-infection has been shown to be highly prevalent among shepherd dogs in southern Hungary, i.e., in a region considered to be free of R. sanguineus. These findings suggest that either other tick species or yet unknown route(s) of infection may also be epidemiologically significant.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)507-512
Number of pages6
JournalMagyar Allatorvosok Lapja
Volume135
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2013

Fingerprint

Hungary
Rhipicephalus sanguineus
Hepatozoon canis
Dogs
dogs
Ticks
Hepatozoon
Canidae
Arthropod Vectors
Infection
Balkan Peninsula
Sporozoites
Lethargy
Cachexia
ticks
Life Cycle Stages
hematophagous arthropods
infection
Vertebrates
Anemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Hornok, S., Viola, F., Gábor, H., Imre, K., Tibor, K., Ferenc, T., ... Farkas, R. (2013). A kutya hepatozoonosisa Európában és Magyarországon: Irodalmi áttekintés. Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja, 135(8), 507-512.

A kutya hepatozoonosisa Európában és Magyarországon : Irodalmi áttekintés. / Hornok, S.; Viola, Farkas; Gábor, Horváth; Imre, Kálmán; Tibor, Kovács; Ferenc, Tóth; Balázs, Tánczos; Farkas, R.

In: Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja, Vol. 135, No. 8, 08.2013, p. 507-512.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hornok, S, Viola, F, Gábor, H, Imre, K, Tibor, K, Ferenc, T, Balázs, T & Farkas, R 2013, 'A kutya hepatozoonosisa Európában és Magyarországon: Irodalmi áttekintés', Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja, vol. 135, no. 8, pp. 507-512.
Hornok S, Viola F, Gábor H, Imre K, Tibor K, Ferenc T et al. A kutya hepatozoonosisa Európában és Magyarországon: Irodalmi áttekintés. Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja. 2013 Aug;135(8):507-512.
Hornok, S. ; Viola, Farkas ; Gábor, Horváth ; Imre, Kálmán ; Tibor, Kovács ; Ferenc, Tóth ; Balázs, Tánczos ; Farkas, R. / A kutya hepatozoonosisa Európában és Magyarországon : Irodalmi áttekintés. In: Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja. 2013 ; Vol. 135, No. 8. pp. 507-512.
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