A hemvas az emberi szervezetben

Translated title of the contribution: Heme-iron in the human body

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Iron is essential for all living organism, although in excess amount it is dangereous via catalizing the formation of reactive oxygen species. Absorption of iron is strictly controlled resulting in a fine balance of iron-loss and iron-uptake. In countries where the ingestion of heme-iron is significant by meal, great part of iron content in the body originates from heme. Heme derived from food is absorbed by a receptor-mediated manner by enterocytes of small intestine then it is degraded in a reaction catalyzed by heme oxygenase. Iron released from the porphyrin ring leaves enterocytes as trasferrin associated iron. Prostetic group of several proteins contains heme, therefore, it is synthesized by all cells. One of the most significant heme proteins is hemoglobin which transports oxygen in the erythrocytes. Hemoglobin released from erythrocyte during intravascular hemolysis binds to haptoglobin and is taken up by cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. Oxidation of hemoglobin (ferro) to methemoglobin (ferri) is inhibitied by the structure of hemoglobin although it is not hindered. Superoxide anion is also formed in the reaction that initiates further free radical reactions. In contrast to ferrohemoglobin, methemoglobin readily releases heme, therefore, oxidation of hemoglobin drives the formation of free heme in plasma. Heme binds to a plasma protein, hemopexin, and is internalized by cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage in a receptor-mediated manner, then degraded in reaction catalysed by heme oxygenase. Heme is also taken up by plasma lipoproteins and endotheial cells leading to oxidation of LDL and subsequent endothelial cell damage. The purpose of this work was to summarize the processes related to heme.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)1699-1706
Number of pages8
JournalOrvosi Hetilap
Volume148
Issue number36
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 9 2007

Fingerprint

Heme
Human Body
Iron
Hemoglobins
Heme Oxygenase (Decyclizing)
Methemoglobin
Enterocytes
Monocytes
Erythrocytes
Macrophages
Hemopexin
Hemeproteins
Haptoglobins
Porphyrins
Hemolysis
Superoxides
Lipoproteins
Small Intestine
Free Radicals
Meals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A hemvas az emberi szervezetben. / Balla, J.; Balla, G.; Lakatos, Béla; Jeney, V.; Szentmihályi, K.

In: Orvosi Hetilap, Vol. 148, No. 36, 09.09.2007, p. 1699-1706.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Balla, J. ; Balla, G. ; Lakatos, Béla ; Jeney, V. ; Szentmihályi, K. / A hemvas az emberi szervezetben. In: Orvosi Hetilap. 2007 ; Vol. 148, No. 36. pp. 1699-1706.
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