Szívférgesség kutyában Irodalmi áttekintés és esetismertetés

Translated title of the contribution: Heartworm disease in dogs. Review article and case report

K. Vörös, Kiss Gabriella, F. Baska, Bagdi Nóra, Z. Széll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

After providing an overview of the occurrence (Figure 1), etiopathogenesis and clinical aspects of canine heartworm disease, a case report is presented to demonstrate the hazard of introducing the disease with animals having lived in endemic countries. A five-year-old male dog of mixed breed was admitted into the clinic, with a two-days long history of depression, exercise intolerance, dyspnea, anorexia, vomitus and voiding of reddish urine. The dog lived in the United States for years with the owner and they returned to Hungary some months before the date of referral. Vaccination history was uncertain and no preventive anthelminthic therapy was performed previously. Clinical examination revealed poor general condition, pale and icteric mucous membranes, and some small, patchy bleedings on the oral mucousa. Mixed type dyspnea with inspiratory efforts was noted, while thoracic auscultation revealed adventitious, non-musical respiratory sounds. No cardiological abnormalities but tachycardia and weak, small pulse were recorded. Abdominal palpation could not be performed due to marked abdominal tension. Blood biochemistry demonstrated hepatic dysfunction and uremia. Hemoglobinuria was detected during urinanalysis. The animal died within some hours after admission, therefore no further examination could be performed. Necropsy revealed several adult Dirofilaria immitis in the blood clots within the caudal vena cava (Figure 2) and within the dilated right ventricle (Figure 3). Centrolobular dystrophy of the liver and bronchopneumonia with pulmonal edema were the additional findings. Post mortem histology demonstrated intercellular myocardlal edema and interstitial bronchopneumonia. Microfilaria were found within the capillaries of the myocardium, interstitial pulmonary capillaries (Figure 4) and in other organs, including spleen and liver. In addition, hemosiderin-containing cellular elements were found in the interstitium of the lung (Figure 5). Microfilaria were demonstrated in the peripheral blood smears with Giemsa staining (Figure 6), as well as in smears taken from blood clots and surfaces of the heart, spleen and liver. Vena cava syndrome due to the oclusion of the caudal vena cava by adult filaria together with blood clots was diagnosed by necropsy and this complication was stated as the cause of sudden deterioration and death of the patient.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)707-716
Number of pages10
JournalMagyar Allatorvosok Lapja
Volume122
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Dirofilariasis
heartworms
dog diseases
vena cava
Venae Cavae
Dogs
case studies
Bronchopneumonia
Microfilariae
bronchopneumonia
liver
Thrombosis
microfilariae
Liver
dyspnea
blood
Dyspnea
edema
necropsy
Edema

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Szívférgesség kutyában Irodalmi áttekintés és esetismertetés. / Vörös, K.; Gabriella, Kiss; Baska, F.; Nóra, Bagdi; Széll, Z.

In: Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja, Vol. 122, No. 12, 2000, p. 707-716.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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