HAT-South: A global network of southern hemisphere automated telescopes to detect transiting exoplanets

G. Bakos, C. Afonso, T. Henning, A. Jordan, M. Holman, R. W. Noyes, P. D. Sackett, D. Sasselov, Gábor Kovács, Z. Csubry, A. Pál

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

HAT-South is a network of six identical, fully automated wide field telescopes, to be located at three sites (Chile: Las Campanas, Australia: Siding Springs, and Namibia: HESS site) in the Southern hemisphere. The primary purpose of the network is to detect and characterize a large number of extra-solar planets transiting nearby bright stars, and to explore their diversity. Operation of HAT-South is a collaboration among the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA) and the Australian National University (ANU). The network is expected to be ready for initial science operations in 2009. The three sites will permit near round-the-clock monitoring of selected fields, and the continuous data-stream will greatly enhance recovery of transits. HAT-South will be sensitive to planetary transits down to R ∼ 14 across a 128 square-degrees combined field of view, thereby targeting a large number of dwarfs with feasible confirmation-mode follow-up. We anticipate a yearly detection rate of approximately 25 planets transiting bright stars.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)354-357
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings of the International Astronomical Union
Volume4
Issue numberS253
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2008

Fingerprint

Southern Hemisphere
extrasolar planets
planet
telescopes
transit
astrophysics
astronomy
field of view
Namibia
targeting
stars
Chile
clocks
planets
monitoring
recovery
detection
rate
science

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

HAT-South : A global network of southern hemisphere automated telescopes to detect transiting exoplanets. / Bakos, G.; Afonso, C.; Henning, T.; Jordan, A.; Holman, M.; Noyes, R. W.; Sackett, P. D.; Sasselov, D.; Kovács, Gábor; Csubry, Z.; Pál, A.

In: Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union, Vol. 4, No. S253, 05.2008, p. 354-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bakos, G, Afonso, C, Henning, T, Jordan, A, Holman, M, Noyes, RW, Sackett, PD, Sasselov, D, Kovács, G, Csubry, Z & Pál, A 2008, 'HAT-South: A global network of southern hemisphere automated telescopes to detect transiting exoplanets', Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union, vol. 4, no. S253, pp. 354-357. https://doi.org/10.1017/S174392130802663X
Bakos, G. ; Afonso, C. ; Henning, T. ; Jordan, A. ; Holman, M. ; Noyes, R. W. ; Sackett, P. D. ; Sasselov, D. ; Kovács, Gábor ; Csubry, Z. ; Pál, A. / HAT-South : A global network of southern hemisphere automated telescopes to detect transiting exoplanets. In: Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union. 2008 ; Vol. 4, No. S253. pp. 354-357.
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