Growth and invasion of human melanomas in human skin grafted to immunodeficient mice

I. Juhász, Steven M. Albelda, David E. Elder, George F. Murphy, Koji Adachi, Dorothee Herlyn, Istvan T. Valyi-Nagy, Meenhard Herlyn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An orthotopic model of human melanoma was developed in which malignant cells were injected into human skin grafted to nude and SCID mice. Melanoma cells proliferated and invaded the human skin grafts with characteristic patterns. Three of six melanomas grew as multiple nodules and infiltered the grafts without major architectural changes in the dermis, whereas the others invaded the demis along collagen fibers with prominent endothelial vessels. By contrast, melanoma cells inoculated into mouse skin grew as diffusely expanding nodules that did not invade the murine dermis. In human skin grafts, human melanoma cells were angiogenic for human blood vessels, and murine vessels were only found at the periphery of grafts. Tumor cells invaded the human vessels, and four out of seven cell lines metastasized to lungs, suggesting that this model is useful to determine in vivo the interactions between normal and malignant human cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)528-537
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Pathology
Volume143
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1993

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Melanoma
Skin
Growth
Transplants
Dermis
SCID Mice
Nude Mice
Blood Vessels
Collagen
Cell Line
Lung
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Juhász, I., Albelda, S. M., Elder, D. E., Murphy, G. F., Adachi, K., Herlyn, D., ... Herlyn, M. (1993). Growth and invasion of human melanomas in human skin grafted to immunodeficient mice. American Journal of Pathology, 143(2), 528-537.

Growth and invasion of human melanomas in human skin grafted to immunodeficient mice. / Juhász, I.; Albelda, Steven M.; Elder, David E.; Murphy, George F.; Adachi, Koji; Herlyn, Dorothee; Valyi-Nagy, Istvan T.; Herlyn, Meenhard.

In: American Journal of Pathology, Vol. 143, No. 2, 08.1993, p. 528-537.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Juhász, I, Albelda, SM, Elder, DE, Murphy, GF, Adachi, K, Herlyn, D, Valyi-Nagy, IT & Herlyn, M 1993, 'Growth and invasion of human melanomas in human skin grafted to immunodeficient mice', American Journal of Pathology, vol. 143, no. 2, pp. 528-537.
Juhász I, Albelda SM, Elder DE, Murphy GF, Adachi K, Herlyn D et al. Growth and invasion of human melanomas in human skin grafted to immunodeficient mice. American Journal of Pathology. 1993 Aug;143(2):528-537.
Juhász, I. ; Albelda, Steven M. ; Elder, David E. ; Murphy, George F. ; Adachi, Koji ; Herlyn, Dorothee ; Valyi-Nagy, Istvan T. ; Herlyn, Meenhard. / Growth and invasion of human melanomas in human skin grafted to immunodeficient mice. In: American Journal of Pathology. 1993 ; Vol. 143, No. 2. pp. 528-537.
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