Grain boundaries in chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene

L. Bíró, Philippe Lambin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most perspective method for producing large-area graphene. The produced graphene sheet is a patchwork of crystallites with random orientation separated by grain boundary (GB) regions. The GBs will have a decisive role in defining the electrical transport properties of graphene films. Their structure may vary from fully periodic to completely disordered depending primarily on the synthesis temperature and substrate used for CVD. The chapter mainly focuses on the experimental findings on graphene grown by CVD under a very wide range of experimental conditions (temperature, pressure hydrogen/hydrocarbon ratio, gas flow velocity, and substrates). The most frequently used methods for atomic-scale characterization of GB structures, their possibilities and limitations, and the alterations of the GBs in CVD graphene during investigation are discussed. The effects of GB disorder on electrical and thermal transport are reviewed and the relatively scarce data available on the chemical properties of the GBs are summarized. GBs are complex-enough nanoobjects that it may be unlikely that two experimentally produced GBs of several microns in length could be completely identical in all of their atomic-scale details, but despite this, certain generalized conclusions may be formulated, which may be helpful for experimentalists in the interpretation of results and in planning new experiments, which could lead to a more systematic picture of GBs in CVD graphene and to a better understanding of ways to improve its electrical transport properties.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGraphene Science Handbook
Subtitle of host publicationMechanical and Chemical Properties
PublisherCRC Press
Pages107-125
Number of pages19
ISBN (Electronic)9781466591240
ISBN (Print)9781466591233
Publication statusPublished - Apr 27 2016

Fingerprint

Graphite
Graphene
Chemical vapor deposition
graphene
Grain boundaries
grain boundaries
vapor deposition
Transport properties
transport properties
Substrates
Hydrocarbons
Crystallites
Flow velocity
Crystal orientation
chemical properties
Chemical properties
crystallites
gas flow
Flow of gases
planning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Bíró, L., & Lambin, P. (2016). Grain boundaries in chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene. In Graphene Science Handbook: Mechanical and Chemical Properties (pp. 107-125). CRC Press.

Grain boundaries in chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene. / Bíró, L.; Lambin, Philippe.

Graphene Science Handbook: Mechanical and Chemical Properties. CRC Press, 2016. p. 107-125.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Bíró, L & Lambin, P 2016, Grain boundaries in chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene. in Graphene Science Handbook: Mechanical and Chemical Properties. CRC Press, pp. 107-125.
Bíró L, Lambin P. Grain boundaries in chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene. In Graphene Science Handbook: Mechanical and Chemical Properties. CRC Press. 2016. p. 107-125
Bíró, L. ; Lambin, Philippe. / Grain boundaries in chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene. Graphene Science Handbook: Mechanical and Chemical Properties. CRC Press, 2016. pp. 107-125
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