Glutathione transport in the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum

M. Csala, Rosella Fulceri, J. Mandl, Angelo Benedetti, G. Bánhegyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Glutathione transport through the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) membrane might play a role in the maintenance of the thiol redox potential difference between the lumen and the cytosol. The transport of glutathione (both GSH and glutathione disulfide, GSSG) is entirely different in the ER and SR membranes. The transport measurements based on either rapid filtration or light scattering techniques revealed that the SR membrane transports glutathione much faster than the hepatic ER membrane or microsomal membranes prepared from heart or brain. The fastest transport has been measured in the membrane of muscle terminal cisternae, which is enriched in ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1). All the studied membranes have been found to be equally impermeable to various hydrophilic substances of similar size to glutathione, thus the glutathione transport in muscle microsomes and terminal cysternae as well as the correlation between the rate of glutathione transport and the abundance of RyR1 are specific. In both muscle microsomes and terminal cysternae, glutathione influx can be either inhibited or activated by antagonists and agonists of the ryanodine receptor, respectively, while these agents do not influence the transport of other small permeant molecules. These findings strongly suggest that the ryanodine receptor channel activity is directly associated with glutathione transport activity in the skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-35
Number of pages9
JournalBioFactors
Volume17
Issue number1-4
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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Sarcoplasmic Reticulum
Glutathione
Membranes
Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel
Muscle
Glutathione Disulfide
Microsomes
Muscles
Sulfhydryl Compounds
Light scattering
Cytosol
Oxidation-Reduction
Brain
Skeletal Muscle
Maintenance
Light
Molecules
Liver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Glutathione transport in the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum. / Csala, M.; Fulceri, Rosella; Mandl, J.; Benedetti, Angelo; Bánhegyi, G.

In: BioFactors, Vol. 17, No. 1-4, 2003, p. 27-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Csala, M, Fulceri, R, Mandl, J, Benedetti, A & Bánhegyi, G 2003, 'Glutathione transport in the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum', BioFactors, vol. 17, no. 1-4, pp. 27-35.
Csala, M. ; Fulceri, Rosella ; Mandl, J. ; Benedetti, Angelo ; Bánhegyi, G. / Glutathione transport in the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum. In: BioFactors. 2003 ; Vol. 17, No. 1-4. pp. 27-35.
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