Glucocorticoid hyper- and hypofunction: Stress effects on cognition and aggression

Jeansok J. Kim, J. Haller

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is now well documented that both increased and decreased stress responses can profoundly affect cognition and behavior. This mini review presents possible neural mechanisms subserving stress effects on memory and aggression, particularly focusing on glucocorticoid (GC) hyper- and hypofunction. First, uncontrollable stress impedes hippocampal memory and long-term potentiation (LTP). Because the hippocampus is important for the stability of long-term memory and because LTP has qualities desirable of an information storage mechanism, it has been hypothesized that stress-induced alterations in LTP contribute to memory impairments. Recent evidence suggests a neural-endocrine network comprising amygdala, prefrontal cortex (PFC), and glucocorticoids may be involved in regulating stress effects on hippocampal mnemonic functioning. Second, antisocial aggressiveness correlates with chronically decreased glucocorticoid production, and this condition leads in rats to behavioral-autonomic deficits reminiscent of the human disorder. Glucocorticoid deficiency-induced antisocial aggressiveness results from functional changes in the PFC, medial and central amygdala, and altered serotonin and substance P neurotransmissions. Accordingly, a neurobiological understanding of how stress and glucocorticoid deficiency alter brain, cognition, and behavior is an important challenge facing modern neuroscience with broad implications for individual and social well-being.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Pages291-303
Number of pages13
Volume1113
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2007

Publication series

NameAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1113
ISSN (Print)00778923
ISSN (Electronic)17496632

Fingerprint

Aggression
Cognition
Glucocorticoids
Long-Term Potentiation
Data storage equipment
Prefrontal Cortex
Long-Term Memory
Information Storage and Retrieval
Substance P
Neurosciences
Amygdala
Synaptic Transmission
Rats
Hippocampus
Brain
Serotonin

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Amygdala
  • Corticosterone
  • Hippocampus
  • Learning
  • Memory
  • Prefrontal cortex
  • Synaptic plasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Kim, J. J., & Haller, J. (2007). Glucocorticoid hyper- and hypofunction: Stress effects on cognition and aggression. In Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (Vol. 1113, pp. 291-303). (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1113). https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1391.014

Glucocorticoid hyper- and hypofunction : Stress effects on cognition and aggression. / Kim, Jeansok J.; Haller, J.

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1113 2007. p. 291-303 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1113).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kim, JJ & Haller, J 2007, Glucocorticoid hyper- and hypofunction: Stress effects on cognition and aggression. in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. vol. 1113, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1113, pp. 291-303. https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1391.014
Kim JJ, Haller J. Glucocorticoid hyper- and hypofunction: Stress effects on cognition and aggression. In Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1113. 2007. p. 291-303. (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences). https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1391.014
Kim, Jeansok J. ; Haller, J. / Glucocorticoid hyper- and hypofunction : Stress effects on cognition and aggression. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1113 2007. pp. 291-303 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences).
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