Global distribution of group A rotavirus strains in horses: A systematic review

Hajnalka Papp, Jelle Matthijnssens, Vito Martella, Max Ciarlet, K. Bányai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Group A rotavirus (RVA) is a major cause of diarrhea and diarrhea-related mortality in foals in parts of the world. In addition to careful horse farm management, vaccination is the only known alternative to reduce the RVA associated disease burden on horse farms. The precise evaluation of vaccine effectiveness against circulating strains needs enhanced surveillance of equine RVAs in areas where vaccine is already available or vaccine introduction is anticipated. Therefore, we undertook the overview of relevant information on epidemiology of equine RVA strains through systematic search of public literature databases. Our findings indicated that over 99% of equine RVA strains characterized during the past three decades belonged to two common genotypes, G3P[12] and G14P[12], whereas most of the minority equine RVA strains were probably introduced from a heterologous host by interspecies transmission. These baseline data on RVA strains in horses shall contribute to a better understanding of the spatiotemporal dynamics of strain prevalence in vaccinated and non-vaccinated herds.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5627-5633
Number of pages7
JournalVaccine
Volume31
Issue number48
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 19 2013

Fingerprint

Rotavirus
systematic review
Horses
horses
Vaccines
vaccines
Diarrhea
diarrhea
burden of disease
farm management
foals
epidemiology
Vaccination
Epidemiology
herds
Genotype
vaccination
Databases
farms
Mortality

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Equine
  • Equus caballus
  • Rotavirus
  • Surveillance
  • Vaccination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • veterinary(all)
  • Molecular Medicine

Cite this

Global distribution of group A rotavirus strains in horses : A systematic review. / Papp, Hajnalka; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Martella, Vito; Ciarlet, Max; Bányai, K.

In: Vaccine, Vol. 31, No. 48, 19.11.2013, p. 5627-5633.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Papp, Hajnalka ; Matthijnssens, Jelle ; Martella, Vito ; Ciarlet, Max ; Bányai, K. / Global distribution of group A rotavirus strains in horses : A systematic review. In: Vaccine. 2013 ; Vol. 31, No. 48. pp. 5627-5633.
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