Az allergiás megbetegedések genomikai megközelítése; lehetóségek és távlatok.

Translated title of the contribution: Genomic approach to allergic diseases: present and future perspectives

C. Szalai, G. Kozma, Adrienne Nagy, Agnes Bojszkó, A. Falus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The rapid advances in genomic research have a major impact on biomedical sciences. In this review the authors summarize the current results of the genomic investigation of allergic diseases. From a genetic point of view allergy is multifactorial, which means that the susceptibility to the disease is determined by interactions between multiple genes, and involve important nongenetic factors such as the environment for their expression. There are two widespread methods for searching for disease susceptibility genes in allergy: (1) genome-wide search and (2) candidate gene association studies. Until now five groups have completed genome-wide searches for asthma, and almost 500 genetic linkage and association studies have reported more than 500 atopy and asthma loci throughout the genome. In this review we selected those results, which were consistently confirmed by several independent studies, or appeared particularly important, or interesting. On the basis of this, 9 chromosome regions can be associated with the susceptibility to allergic diseases: 2q, 5q31-q33, 6p21.3, 7q31, 11q13, 12q14.3-q24.31, 14q11.2-q13, 16p21, 17q11.2. According to the results of the human genome programs, and association studies, the authors discuss the possible roles of candidate genes found in these loci in the pathomechanism of allergy. Besides, the authors summarize briefly the results of pharmacogenomics, and animal linkage and genetics studies related to allergy.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)381-390
Number of pages10
JournalOrvosi Hetilap
Volume143
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - Feb 24 2002

Fingerprint

Hypersensitivity
Genetic Linkage
Disease Susceptibility
Genetic Association Studies
Genome
Asthma
Genes
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9
Pharmacogenetics
Human Genome
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Az allergiás megbetegedések genomikai megközelítése; lehetóségek és távlatok. / Szalai, C.; Kozma, G.; Nagy, Adrienne; Bojszkó, Agnes; Falus, A.

In: Orvosi Hetilap, Vol. 143, No. 8, 24.02.2002, p. 381-390.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b8e9851b344b48a49cf936c171c86dc8,
title = "Az allergi{\'a}s megbeteged{\'e}sek genomikai megk{\"o}zel{\'i}t{\'e}se; lehet{\'o}s{\'e}gek {\'e}s t{\'a}vlatok.",
abstract = "The rapid advances in genomic research have a major impact on biomedical sciences. In this review the authors summarize the current results of the genomic investigation of allergic diseases. From a genetic point of view allergy is multifactorial, which means that the susceptibility to the disease is determined by interactions between multiple genes, and involve important nongenetic factors such as the environment for their expression. There are two widespread methods for searching for disease susceptibility genes in allergy: (1) genome-wide search and (2) candidate gene association studies. Until now five groups have completed genome-wide searches for asthma, and almost 500 genetic linkage and association studies have reported more than 500 atopy and asthma loci throughout the genome. In this review we selected those results, which were consistently confirmed by several independent studies, or appeared particularly important, or interesting. On the basis of this, 9 chromosome regions can be associated with the susceptibility to allergic diseases: 2q, 5q31-q33, 6p21.3, 7q31, 11q13, 12q14.3-q24.31, 14q11.2-q13, 16p21, 17q11.2. According to the results of the human genome programs, and association studies, the authors discuss the possible roles of candidate genes found in these loci in the pathomechanism of allergy. Besides, the authors summarize briefly the results of pharmacogenomics, and animal linkage and genetics studies related to allergy.",
author = "C. Szalai and G. Kozma and Adrienne Nagy and Agnes Bojszk{\'o} and A. Falus",
year = "2002",
month = "2",
day = "24",
language = "Hungarian",
volume = "143",
pages = "381--390",
journal = "Orvosi Hetilap",
issn = "0030-6002",
publisher = "Akademiai Kiado",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Az allergiás megbetegedések genomikai megközelítése; lehetóségek és távlatok.

AU - Szalai, C.

AU - Kozma, G.

AU - Nagy, Adrienne

AU - Bojszkó, Agnes

AU - Falus, A.

PY - 2002/2/24

Y1 - 2002/2/24

N2 - The rapid advances in genomic research have a major impact on biomedical sciences. In this review the authors summarize the current results of the genomic investigation of allergic diseases. From a genetic point of view allergy is multifactorial, which means that the susceptibility to the disease is determined by interactions between multiple genes, and involve important nongenetic factors such as the environment for their expression. There are two widespread methods for searching for disease susceptibility genes in allergy: (1) genome-wide search and (2) candidate gene association studies. Until now five groups have completed genome-wide searches for asthma, and almost 500 genetic linkage and association studies have reported more than 500 atopy and asthma loci throughout the genome. In this review we selected those results, which were consistently confirmed by several independent studies, or appeared particularly important, or interesting. On the basis of this, 9 chromosome regions can be associated with the susceptibility to allergic diseases: 2q, 5q31-q33, 6p21.3, 7q31, 11q13, 12q14.3-q24.31, 14q11.2-q13, 16p21, 17q11.2. According to the results of the human genome programs, and association studies, the authors discuss the possible roles of candidate genes found in these loci in the pathomechanism of allergy. Besides, the authors summarize briefly the results of pharmacogenomics, and animal linkage and genetics studies related to allergy.

AB - The rapid advances in genomic research have a major impact on biomedical sciences. In this review the authors summarize the current results of the genomic investigation of allergic diseases. From a genetic point of view allergy is multifactorial, which means that the susceptibility to the disease is determined by interactions between multiple genes, and involve important nongenetic factors such as the environment for their expression. There are two widespread methods for searching for disease susceptibility genes in allergy: (1) genome-wide search and (2) candidate gene association studies. Until now five groups have completed genome-wide searches for asthma, and almost 500 genetic linkage and association studies have reported more than 500 atopy and asthma loci throughout the genome. In this review we selected those results, which were consistently confirmed by several independent studies, or appeared particularly important, or interesting. On the basis of this, 9 chromosome regions can be associated with the susceptibility to allergic diseases: 2q, 5q31-q33, 6p21.3, 7q31, 11q13, 12q14.3-q24.31, 14q11.2-q13, 16p21, 17q11.2. According to the results of the human genome programs, and association studies, the authors discuss the possible roles of candidate genes found in these loci in the pathomechanism of allergy. Besides, the authors summarize briefly the results of pharmacogenomics, and animal linkage and genetics studies related to allergy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037165485&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037165485&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11921704

AN - SCOPUS:0037165485

VL - 143

SP - 381

EP - 390

JO - Orvosi Hetilap

JF - Orvosi Hetilap

SN - 0030-6002

IS - 8

ER -