Genome-wide gene expression study indicates the anti-inflammatory effect of polarized light in recurrent childhood respiratory disease

A. Falus, M. Fenyo, K. Éder, A. Madarasi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives The clinical and molecular effects of wholebody polarized light treatment on children suffering from recurrent respiratory infection were studied. Methods The incidence and duration of respiratory symptoms as well as the length of appropriate antibiotic therapy were measured. Simultaneously, the genome-wide gene expression pattern was examined by whole genome cDNA microarray in peripheral lymphocytes of children. Results Twenty of 25 children showed a marked clinical improvement, while in five of 25 had poor response or no changes. The gene expression pattern of the patients' peripheral lymphocytes was compared in favorable and poor responders. The lymphocytes of the children with a documented improved clinical response to polarized light therapy showed a decrease in the expression of chemokine genes, such as CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, and IL-8, and in that of the TNFa gene. On the contrary, a rapid elevation was found in the expression of the gene encoding for CYP4F2, a leukotriene B4-metabolizing enzyme. In children with poor clinical response to polarized light therapy, no similar changes were detected in the gene expression pattern of the lymphocytes. Conclusions The improved clinical symptoms and modified gene expression profile of lymphocytes reveals an anti-inflammatory effect of whole-body polarized light irradiation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)965-972
Number of pages8
JournalInflammation Research
Volume60
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011

Fingerprint

Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Genome
Lymphocytes
Gene Expression
Light
Phototherapy
Leukotriene B4
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Interleukin-8
Transcriptome
Chemokines
Respiratory Tract Infections
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Incidence
Enzymes
Therapeutics
Genes

Keywords

  • Chemokine
  • Gene expression
  • Inflammation
  • Leukotriene B4
  • Polarized light
  • Respiratory symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Genome-wide gene expression study indicates the anti-inflammatory effect of polarized light in recurrent childhood respiratory disease. / Falus, A.; Fenyo, M.; Éder, K.; Madarasi, A.

In: Inflammation Research, Vol. 60, No. 10, 10.2011, p. 965-972.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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