Genetic diversity in Ampelomyces isolates, hyperparasites of powdery mildew fungi, inferred from RFLP analysis of the rDNA ITS region

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Abstract

Pycnidial hyperparasites of powdery mildew fungi, often used in biological control experiments, are currently considered as belonging to a single species, Ampelomyces quisqualis. However, RFLP analysis of the nuclear rDNA ITS region in a worldwide collection of Ampelomyces isolates showed the existence of seven RFLP groups. Cultural characters, e.g. growth rate of isolates, correlated with the exhibited restriction patterns. The results suggested that A. quisqualis should be regarded as a problematic species complex. The geographical distribution of genetically distinct isolates showed that (1) isolates belonging to the same RFLP group were present even in different continents in their fungal hosts, and (ii) isolates representing various RFLP groups were found in the same geographical region, in the same species of the Erysiphaceae and on the same host plants. The detected genetic differences could influence the applicability of various isolates in biological control.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1073-1080
Number of pages8
JournalMycological Research
Volume101
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997

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Ampelomyces
Ribosomal DNA
powdery mildew
biological control
Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms
restriction fragment length polymorphism
Ampelomyces quisqualis
Fungi
fungus
genetic variation
fungi
geographical region
species complex
geographical distribution
host plant
Erysiphaceae
host plants
experiment
genetic diversity
analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Plant Science

Cite this

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title = "Genetic diversity in Ampelomyces isolates, hyperparasites of powdery mildew fungi, inferred from RFLP analysis of the rDNA ITS region",
abstract = "Pycnidial hyperparasites of powdery mildew fungi, often used in biological control experiments, are currently considered as belonging to a single species, Ampelomyces quisqualis. However, RFLP analysis of the nuclear rDNA ITS region in a worldwide collection of Ampelomyces isolates showed the existence of seven RFLP groups. Cultural characters, e.g. growth rate of isolates, correlated with the exhibited restriction patterns. The results suggested that A. quisqualis should be regarded as a problematic species complex. The geographical distribution of genetically distinct isolates showed that (1) isolates belonging to the same RFLP group were present even in different continents in their fungal hosts, and (ii) isolates representing various RFLP groups were found in the same geographical region, in the same species of the Erysiphaceae and on the same host plants. The detected genetic differences could influence the applicability of various isolates in biological control.",
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