Genetic and epigenetic determinants of aggression

Barbara Klausz, J. Haller, Áron Tulogdi, D. Zelena

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Every year many people worldwide die because of assault, and many more become victims of aggressive behavior including terrorism and hooliganism. Although aggression is an adaptive response to social challenges of the environment, pathological forms, mostly associated with other psychological disturbances, are highly destructive. Several brain regions (like hypothalamic attach are, medial amygdala, periaqueductal gray) and several molecules (testosterone, serotonin, vasopressin, etc.) are involved in the development of this behavior, but one of the most important determinants is the behavior of the encounter. Therefore, it is not surprising that epigenetic changes, connecting environment with gene activation, could be highly involved in fine-tuning the brain structures and molecular network taking part in aggression. In the last few decades, a lot of knowledge accumulated about epigenetic modification during development and in cancer formation; however, little is known about the role of epigenetic changes in mature cells. In this chapter, we summarize the available evidence on connection between aggression and genetic and epigenetic modification. One of the main determinants of this behavior, testosterone acts-at least partly-on epigenome. Other important contributors, like parts of the serotonergic system, vasopressin, and neurotrophins, underwent epigenetic regulations. Moreover, inhibition of histone deacetylase influences the aggressive behavior of animals. All the reviewed studies support the importance of genetic and epigenetic changes in the development of aggression.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPatho-Epigenetics of Disease
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages227-280
Number of pages54
Volume9781461433453
ISBN (Print)9781461433453, 1461433444, 9781461433446
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2012

Fingerprint

Aggression
Epigenomics
Vasopressins
Testosterone
Terrorism
Periaqueductal Gray
Animal Behavior
Histone Deacetylases
Social Environment
Nerve Growth Factors
Brain
Amygdala
Molecular Structure
Transcriptional Activation
Serotonin
Psychology
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Klausz, B., Haller, J., Tulogdi, Á., & Zelena, D. (2012). Genetic and epigenetic determinants of aggression. In Patho-Epigenetics of Disease (Vol. 9781461433453, pp. 227-280). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-3345-3_9

Genetic and epigenetic determinants of aggression. / Klausz, Barbara; Haller, J.; Tulogdi, Áron; Zelena, D.

Patho-Epigenetics of Disease. Vol. 9781461433453 Springer New York, 2012. p. 227-280.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Klausz, B, Haller, J, Tulogdi, Á & Zelena, D 2012, Genetic and epigenetic determinants of aggression. in Patho-Epigenetics of Disease. vol. 9781461433453, Springer New York, pp. 227-280. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-3345-3_9
Klausz B, Haller J, Tulogdi Á, Zelena D. Genetic and epigenetic determinants of aggression. In Patho-Epigenetics of Disease. Vol. 9781461433453. Springer New York. 2012. p. 227-280 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-3345-3_9
Klausz, Barbara ; Haller, J. ; Tulogdi, Áron ; Zelena, D. / Genetic and epigenetic determinants of aggression. Patho-Epigenetics of Disease. Vol. 9781461433453 Springer New York, 2012. pp. 227-280
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