Régi, hazai madárinfluenza-vírusok genetikai jellemzése

Translated title of the contribution: Genetic analysis of old Hungarian avian influenza viruses

Szeleczky Zsófia, S. Kecskeméti, Kiss István, B. Lomniczi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Certain genes of 13 avian influenza viruses (AIV) isolated in the 1970s were subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The viruses derived from the eastern part of Hungary from ducks and guinea fowls with relatively severe respiratory signs. In addition to the hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes (H4, H5, H6, H7 and H10) identified at the time by serological methods, neuraminidase (NA) subtypes have been identified with genetic analysis (table). Based on the amino acid pattern at the proteolytic cleavage site of the HA, it was ascertained that all H5 and H7 strains belonged to the low pathogenicity (LP) category. Phylogenetic analysis of the HA, NA and NS genes allowed the following epidemiological conclusions to be drawn. (1) All Hungarian strains belonged to the Eurasian lineage of AIV. (2) H5 strains were the members of an old European group {Figure 1). The H4 strains (Figure 2) originated from three different sources (two from the Far East while one from Europe). (3) The fact that most viruses in H4 and H5 subtypes were reassortants (some even multiple ones; Figure 3) suggested that their reservoirs were unlikely to be wild aquatic birds but rather domestic ducks. Further studies of old viruses would be needed for a more detailed knowledge on the role of these "artificial" reservoirs in the maintenance and epidemiology of AIV.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)165-179
Number of pages15
JournalMagyar Allatorvosok Lapja
Volume130
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Influenza in Birds
Hemagglutinins
Orthomyxoviridae
Influenza A virus
genetic techniques and protocols
hemagglutinins
Ducks
Neuraminidase
Viruses
sialidase
viruses
ducks
Guinea
Far East
Hungary
guineafowl
Genes
Birds
Virulence
phylogeny

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Régi, hazai madárinfluenza-vírusok genetikai jellemzése. / Zsófia, Szeleczky; Kecskeméti, S.; István, Kiss; Lomniczi, B.

In: Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja, Vol. 130, No. 3, 2008, p. 165-179.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zsófia, Szeleczky ; Kecskeméti, S. ; István, Kiss ; Lomniczi, B. / Régi, hazai madárinfluenza-vírusok genetikai jellemzése. In: Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja. 2008 ; Vol. 130, No. 3. pp. 165-179.
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