Genes Linking Mitochondrial Function, Cognitive Impairment and Depression are Associated with Endophenotypes Serving Precision Medicine

Peter Petschner, X. Gonda, Daniel Baksa, Nora Eszlari, Michael Trivaks, G. Juhász, Gyorgy Bagdy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mitochondria densely populate cells in central nervous system providing essential energy for neurons and influencing synaptic plasticity. Harm to these organelles can impair cognitive performance through damaged neurotransmission and altered Ca2+ homeostasis. Impaired cognition could be one underlying factor which can characterize major depressive disorder, a huge burden for society marked by depressed mood and anhedonia. A growing body of evidence binds mitochondrial dysfunctions with the disease. Cognitive disturbances with different severity are also observable in several patients, suggesting that damage or inherited alterations of mitochondria may have an important role in depression. Since several different biological and environmental factors can lead to depression, mitochondrial changes may represent a significant subgroup of depressive patients although cognitive correlates can remain undiscovered without a specific focus. Hypothesis driven studies instead of GWAS can pinpoint targets relevant only in a subset of depressed population. This review highlights results mainly from candidate gene studies on nuclear DNA of mitochondrion-related proteins, including TOMM40, MTHFD1L, ATP6V1B2 and MAO genes, also implicated in Alzheimer's disease, and alterations in the mitochondrial genome to argue for endophenotypes where impaired mitochondrial function may be the leading cause for depressive symptomatology and parallel cognitive dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-217
Number of pages11
JournalNeuroscience
Volume370
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2018

Fingerprint

Endophenotypes
Precision Medicine
Mitochondrial Genes
Mitochondria
Depression
Anhedonia
Neuronal Plasticity
Mitochondrial Genome
Genome-Wide Association Study
Monoamine Oxidase
Major Depressive Disorder
Biological Factors
Synaptic Transmission
Organelles
Cognition
Genes
Alzheimer Disease
Homeostasis
Central Nervous System
Neurons

Keywords

  • mtDNA
  • mutation load
  • ND5
  • oxidative phosphorylation
  • precision medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Genes Linking Mitochondrial Function, Cognitive Impairment and Depression are Associated with Endophenotypes Serving Precision Medicine. / Petschner, Peter; Gonda, X.; Baksa, Daniel; Eszlari, Nora; Trivaks, Michael; Juhász, G.; Bagdy, Gyorgy.

In: Neuroscience, Vol. 370, 01.02.2018, p. 207-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Petschner, Peter ; Gonda, X. ; Baksa, Daniel ; Eszlari, Nora ; Trivaks, Michael ; Juhász, G. ; Bagdy, Gyorgy. / Genes Linking Mitochondrial Function, Cognitive Impairment and Depression are Associated with Endophenotypes Serving Precision Medicine. In: Neuroscience. 2018 ; Vol. 370. pp. 207-217.
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