Gene expression changes in schizophrenia: How do they arise and what do they mean?

David A. Lewis, Károly Mirnics, Pat Levitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The advent of different methods for quantifying messenger RNAs has made it possible to assess the tissue levels of the transcription products of virtually every gene expressed in the human brain, and to determine whether the expression of each gene is altered in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. However, these advances have raised a number of interpretive questions, including what causes disease-related mRNA expression changes and what such changes mean for the function of the affected brain circuits. In this paper, we consider possible answers to these questions for two genes, Regulator of G Protein Signaling 4 (RGS4) and the 67 kilodalton isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67), both of which have been found to be under-expressed in the prefrontal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15-21
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Neuroscience Research
Volume5
Issue number1 SPEC. ISS.
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2005

Fingerprint

Schizophrenia
GTP-Binding Protein Regulators
Gene Expression
Messenger RNA
Glutamate Decarboxylase
Brain
Prefrontal Cortex
Genes
Psychiatry
Protein Isoforms

Keywords

  • Gene expression
  • Glutamic acid decarboxylase
  • Regulator of G-protein signaling 4
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Neurology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Gene expression changes in schizophrenia : How do they arise and what do they mean? / Lewis, David A.; Mirnics, Károly; Levitt, Pat.

In: Clinical Neuroscience Research, Vol. 5, No. 1 SPEC. ISS., 09.2005, p. 15-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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