Gender-related differences in adolescent hypertension and in target organ effects

Mária Juhász, E. Katona, Georgios Settakis, G. Paragh, Csilla Molnár, B. Fülesdi, D. Páll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To assess whether a gender difference exists in adolescent hypertension and its target organ damage and to compare potential confounding factors and target organ damage in hypertensive and normotensive adolescent girls. Methods: From the Debrecen Hypertension Study, the anthropometric, blood pressure, and laboratory data as well as intima-media thickness (IMT) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) of 58 hypertensive boys, 56 hypertensive girls, and 30 normotensive girls were analyzed. Results: Both systolic and mean blood pressure values were higher in adolescent hypertensive boys than in girls. This difference was also present when comparing 24-hour average blood pressure values. Plasma concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin-1 were not different in the two gender groups. IMT of the carotid arteries were similar in hypertensive boys and girls, but a significantly higher LVMI was detected in boys. A significant difference was detected in anthropometric data (height, weight, and body mass index [BMI]), plasma concentration of NO (lower levels in hypertensives), and IMT in hypertensive and normotensive girls (higher IMT in hypertensive girls). Conclusions: There is a difference between the severity of hypertension between hypertensive adolescent girls and boys. Hypertensive girls differ from normotensive girls not only in blood pressure values but also in risk factors and subclinical target organ effects. Further studies are needed to explain the gender differences in adolescent hypertension. The potential role of sex hormones in hypertensive teenagers also needs to be clarified in future works.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)759-765
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2010

Fingerprint

Hypertension
Blood Pressure
Nitric Oxide
Gonadal Steroid Hormones
Endothelin-1
Carotid Arteries
Body Mass Index
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Gender-related differences in adolescent hypertension and in target organ effects. / Juhász, Mária; Katona, E.; Settakis, Georgios; Paragh, G.; Molnár, Csilla; Fülesdi, B.; Páll, D.

In: Journal of Women's Health, Vol. 19, No. 4, 01.04.2010, p. 759-765.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{034d5f2f536f4178af8b7c1019150620,
title = "Gender-related differences in adolescent hypertension and in target organ effects",
abstract = "Aims: To assess whether a gender difference exists in adolescent hypertension and its target organ damage and to compare potential confounding factors and target organ damage in hypertensive and normotensive adolescent girls. Methods: From the Debrecen Hypertension Study, the anthropometric, blood pressure, and laboratory data as well as intima-media thickness (IMT) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) of 58 hypertensive boys, 56 hypertensive girls, and 30 normotensive girls were analyzed. Results: Both systolic and mean blood pressure values were higher in adolescent hypertensive boys than in girls. This difference was also present when comparing 24-hour average blood pressure values. Plasma concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin-1 were not different in the two gender groups. IMT of the carotid arteries were similar in hypertensive boys and girls, but a significantly higher LVMI was detected in boys. A significant difference was detected in anthropometric data (height, weight, and body mass index [BMI]), plasma concentration of NO (lower levels in hypertensives), and IMT in hypertensive and normotensive girls (higher IMT in hypertensive girls). Conclusions: There is a difference between the severity of hypertension between hypertensive adolescent girls and boys. Hypertensive girls differ from normotensive girls not only in blood pressure values but also in risk factors and subclinical target organ effects. Further studies are needed to explain the gender differences in adolescent hypertension. The potential role of sex hormones in hypertensive teenagers also needs to be clarified in future works.",
author = "M{\'a}ria Juh{\'a}sz and E. Katona and Georgios Settakis and G. Paragh and Csilla Moln{\'a}r and B. F{\"u}lesdi and D. P{\'a}ll",
year = "2010",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/jwh.2009.1407",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "759--765",
journal = "Journal of Women's Health",
issn = "1540-9996",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gender-related differences in adolescent hypertension and in target organ effects

AU - Juhász, Mária

AU - Katona, E.

AU - Settakis, Georgios

AU - Paragh, G.

AU - Molnár, Csilla

AU - Fülesdi, B.

AU - Páll, D.

PY - 2010/4/1

Y1 - 2010/4/1

N2 - Aims: To assess whether a gender difference exists in adolescent hypertension and its target organ damage and to compare potential confounding factors and target organ damage in hypertensive and normotensive adolescent girls. Methods: From the Debrecen Hypertension Study, the anthropometric, blood pressure, and laboratory data as well as intima-media thickness (IMT) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) of 58 hypertensive boys, 56 hypertensive girls, and 30 normotensive girls were analyzed. Results: Both systolic and mean blood pressure values were higher in adolescent hypertensive boys than in girls. This difference was also present when comparing 24-hour average blood pressure values. Plasma concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin-1 were not different in the two gender groups. IMT of the carotid arteries were similar in hypertensive boys and girls, but a significantly higher LVMI was detected in boys. A significant difference was detected in anthropometric data (height, weight, and body mass index [BMI]), plasma concentration of NO (lower levels in hypertensives), and IMT in hypertensive and normotensive girls (higher IMT in hypertensive girls). Conclusions: There is a difference between the severity of hypertension between hypertensive adolescent girls and boys. Hypertensive girls differ from normotensive girls not only in blood pressure values but also in risk factors and subclinical target organ effects. Further studies are needed to explain the gender differences in adolescent hypertension. The potential role of sex hormones in hypertensive teenagers also needs to be clarified in future works.

AB - Aims: To assess whether a gender difference exists in adolescent hypertension and its target organ damage and to compare potential confounding factors and target organ damage in hypertensive and normotensive adolescent girls. Methods: From the Debrecen Hypertension Study, the anthropometric, blood pressure, and laboratory data as well as intima-media thickness (IMT) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) of 58 hypertensive boys, 56 hypertensive girls, and 30 normotensive girls were analyzed. Results: Both systolic and mean blood pressure values were higher in adolescent hypertensive boys than in girls. This difference was also present when comparing 24-hour average blood pressure values. Plasma concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin-1 were not different in the two gender groups. IMT of the carotid arteries were similar in hypertensive boys and girls, but a significantly higher LVMI was detected in boys. A significant difference was detected in anthropometric data (height, weight, and body mass index [BMI]), plasma concentration of NO (lower levels in hypertensives), and IMT in hypertensive and normotensive girls (higher IMT in hypertensive girls). Conclusions: There is a difference between the severity of hypertension between hypertensive adolescent girls and boys. Hypertensive girls differ from normotensive girls not only in blood pressure values but also in risk factors and subclinical target organ effects. Further studies are needed to explain the gender differences in adolescent hypertension. The potential role of sex hormones in hypertensive teenagers also needs to be clarified in future works.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77951790094&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77951790094&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/jwh.2009.1407

DO - 10.1089/jwh.2009.1407

M3 - Article

C2 - 20187749

AN - SCOPUS:77951790094

VL - 19

SP - 759

EP - 765

JO - Journal of Women's Health

JF - Journal of Women's Health

SN - 1540-9996

IS - 4

ER -