Gender Differences in the Association Between Cyberbullying Victimization and Perpetration

The Role of Anger Rumination and Traditional Bullying Experiences

Ágnes Zsila, R. Urbán, Mark D. Griffiths, Z. Demetrovics

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies investigating the similarities and differences in traditional bullying and cyberbullying experiences have demonstrated considerable gender differences concerning its determinants. The aim of the present study was to provide further evidence for the differential role of determinants for males and females by investigating the moderating role of traditional bullying and anger rumination in the relationship of past cyberbullying victimization and recent cyberbullying perpetration in respect to gender. A total of 1500 Hungarian adolescents and adults (57.9% male, Mage = 28.9 years, SD = 8.7) completed an online survey on bullying experiences. Results indicated that males were more likely than females to engage in cyberbullying when they had been previously bullied online. Furthermore, high anger rumination elevated the risk of perpetration among male cyberbullying victims, while repeated victimization in traditional bullying increased the risk of cyberbullying perpetration among females. These results underline the importance of considering gender differences in intervention efforts against bullying.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Mental Health and Addiction
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Mar 20 2018

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Bullying
Crime Victims
Anger

Keywords

  • Anger rumination
  • Cyberbullying
  • Cyberharassment
  • Online bullying
  • Perpetration
  • Traditional bullying

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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abstract = "Studies investigating the similarities and differences in traditional bullying and cyberbullying experiences have demonstrated considerable gender differences concerning its determinants. The aim of the present study was to provide further evidence for the differential role of determinants for males and females by investigating the moderating role of traditional bullying and anger rumination in the relationship of past cyberbullying victimization and recent cyberbullying perpetration in respect to gender. A total of 1500 Hungarian adolescents and adults (57.9{\%} male, Mage = 28.9 years, SD = 8.7) completed an online survey on bullying experiences. Results indicated that males were more likely than females to engage in cyberbullying when they had been previously bullied online. Furthermore, high anger rumination elevated the risk of perpetration among male cyberbullying victims, while repeated victimization in traditional bullying increased the risk of cyberbullying perpetration among females. These results underline the importance of considering gender differences in intervention efforts against bullying.",
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