Gastrointestinal (non-systemic) antibiotic rifaximin differentially affects chronic stress-induced changes in colon microbiome and gut permeability without effect on behavior

Dániel Kuti, Zsuzsanna Winkler, Krisztina Horváth, Balázs Juhász, Melinda Paholcsek, Anikó Stágel, Gabriella Gulyás, Levente Czeglédi, Szilamér Ferenczi, Krisztina J. Kovács

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic stress is often accompanied by gastrointestinal symptoms, which might be due to stress-induced shift of gut microbiome to pathogenic bacteria. It has been hypothesized that stress alters gut permeability and results in mild endotoxemia which exaggerates HPA activity and contributes to anxiety and depression. To reveal the relationship between microbiome composition, stress-induced gastrointestinal functions and behavior, we treated chronically stressed mice with non-absorbable antibiotic, rifaximin. The “two hits” stress paradigm was used, where newborn mice were separated from their mothers for 3 h daily as early life adversity (maternal separation, MS) and exposed to 4 weeks chronic variable stress (CVS) as adults. 16S rRNA based analysis of gut microbiome revealed increases of Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria and more specifically, Clostridium species in chronically stressed animals. In mice exposed to MS + CVS, we found extenuation of colonic mucosa, increased bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph node, elevation of plasma LPS levels and infiltration of F4/80 positive macrophages into the colon lamina propria. Chronically stressed mice displayed behavioral signs of anxiety-like behavior and neophobia. Rifaximin treatment decreased Clostridium concentration, gut permeability and LPS plasma concentration and increased colonic expression of tight junction proteins (TJP1, TJP2) and occludin. However, these beneficial effects of rifaximin in chronically stressed mice was not accompanied by positive changes in behavior. Our results suggest that non-absorbable antibiotic treatment alleviates stress-induced local pathologies, however, does not affect stress-induced behavior.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBrain, Behavior, and Immunity
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • Antibiotic
  • Chronic variable stress
  • Clostridium
  • Ethogram
  • F4/80
  • LPS
  • Maternal separation
  • Mesenteric lymph node
  • Neophobia
  • Reg3b
  • Tight junction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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