Gastric mucosal integrity: Gastric mucosal blood flow and microcirculation. An overview

Omar M E Abdel-Salam, József Czimmer, András Debreceni, J. Szolcsányi, G. Mózsik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The stomach is in a state of continuous exposure to potentially hazardous agents. Hydrochloric acid together with pepsin constitutes a major and serious threat to the gastric mucosa. Reflux of alkaline duodenal contents containing bile and pancreatic enzymes are additional important injurious factors of endogenous origin. Alcohol, cigarette smoking, drugs and particularly aspirin and aspirin-like drugs, and steriods are among exogenous mucosal irritants that can inflict mucosal injury. The ability of the stomach to defend itself against these noxious agents has been ascribed to a number of factors constituting the gastric mucosal defense. These include mucus and bicarbonate secreted by surface epithelial cells, prostaglandins, sulfhydryl compounds and gastric mucosal blood flow. The latter is considered by several researchers to be of paramount importance in maintaining gastric mucosal integrity. The aim of this paper is to review the experimental and clinical data dealing with the role of mucosal blood flow and in particular the microcirculation in both damage and protection of the gastric mucosa.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)105-127
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Physiology Paris
Volume95
Issue number1-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Microcirculation
Stomach
Gastric Mucosa
Aspirin
Duodenogastric Reflux
Aptitude
Hydrochloric Acid
Irritants
Pepsin A
Mucus
Bicarbonates
Sulfhydryl Compounds
Bile
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Prostaglandins
Smoking
Epithelial Cells
Alcohols
Research Personnel
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Gastric mucosal blood flow
  • Gastric mucosal damage
  • Mucosal protection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Gastric mucosal integrity : Gastric mucosal blood flow and microcirculation. An overview. / Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Czimmer, József; Debreceni, András; Szolcsányi, J.; Mózsik, G.

In: Journal of Physiology Paris, Vol. 95, No. 1-6, 2001, p. 105-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abdel-Salam, Omar M E ; Czimmer, József ; Debreceni, András ; Szolcsányi, J. ; Mózsik, G. / Gastric mucosal integrity : Gastric mucosal blood flow and microcirculation. An overview. In: Journal of Physiology Paris. 2001 ; Vol. 95, No. 1-6. pp. 105-127.
@article{aaacc766479140158fad37b052d3ff5e,
title = "Gastric mucosal integrity: Gastric mucosal blood flow and microcirculation. An overview",
abstract = "The stomach is in a state of continuous exposure to potentially hazardous agents. Hydrochloric acid together with pepsin constitutes a major and serious threat to the gastric mucosa. Reflux of alkaline duodenal contents containing bile and pancreatic enzymes are additional important injurious factors of endogenous origin. Alcohol, cigarette smoking, drugs and particularly aspirin and aspirin-like drugs, and steriods are among exogenous mucosal irritants that can inflict mucosal injury. The ability of the stomach to defend itself against these noxious agents has been ascribed to a number of factors constituting the gastric mucosal defense. These include mucus and bicarbonate secreted by surface epithelial cells, prostaglandins, sulfhydryl compounds and gastric mucosal blood flow. The latter is considered by several researchers to be of paramount importance in maintaining gastric mucosal integrity. The aim of this paper is to review the experimental and clinical data dealing with the role of mucosal blood flow and in particular the microcirculation in both damage and protection of the gastric mucosa.",
keywords = "Gastric mucosal blood flow, Gastric mucosal damage, Mucosal protection",
author = "Abdel-Salam, {Omar M E} and J{\'o}zsef Czimmer and Andr{\'a}s Debreceni and J. Szolcs{\'a}nyi and G. M{\'o}zsik",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1016/S0928-4257(01)00015-8",
language = "English",
volume = "95",
pages = "105--127",
journal = "Journal de Physiologie",
issn = "0928-4257",
publisher = "Elsevier Masson SAS",
number = "1-6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gastric mucosal integrity

T2 - Gastric mucosal blood flow and microcirculation. An overview

AU - Abdel-Salam, Omar M E

AU - Czimmer, József

AU - Debreceni, András

AU - Szolcsányi, J.

AU - Mózsik, G.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - The stomach is in a state of continuous exposure to potentially hazardous agents. Hydrochloric acid together with pepsin constitutes a major and serious threat to the gastric mucosa. Reflux of alkaline duodenal contents containing bile and pancreatic enzymes are additional important injurious factors of endogenous origin. Alcohol, cigarette smoking, drugs and particularly aspirin and aspirin-like drugs, and steriods are among exogenous mucosal irritants that can inflict mucosal injury. The ability of the stomach to defend itself against these noxious agents has been ascribed to a number of factors constituting the gastric mucosal defense. These include mucus and bicarbonate secreted by surface epithelial cells, prostaglandins, sulfhydryl compounds and gastric mucosal blood flow. The latter is considered by several researchers to be of paramount importance in maintaining gastric mucosal integrity. The aim of this paper is to review the experimental and clinical data dealing with the role of mucosal blood flow and in particular the microcirculation in both damage and protection of the gastric mucosa.

AB - The stomach is in a state of continuous exposure to potentially hazardous agents. Hydrochloric acid together with pepsin constitutes a major and serious threat to the gastric mucosa. Reflux of alkaline duodenal contents containing bile and pancreatic enzymes are additional important injurious factors of endogenous origin. Alcohol, cigarette smoking, drugs and particularly aspirin and aspirin-like drugs, and steriods are among exogenous mucosal irritants that can inflict mucosal injury. The ability of the stomach to defend itself against these noxious agents has been ascribed to a number of factors constituting the gastric mucosal defense. These include mucus and bicarbonate secreted by surface epithelial cells, prostaglandins, sulfhydryl compounds and gastric mucosal blood flow. The latter is considered by several researchers to be of paramount importance in maintaining gastric mucosal integrity. The aim of this paper is to review the experimental and clinical data dealing with the role of mucosal blood flow and in particular the microcirculation in both damage and protection of the gastric mucosa.

KW - Gastric mucosal blood flow

KW - Gastric mucosal damage

KW - Mucosal protection

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034751915&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034751915&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0928-4257(01)00015-8

DO - 10.1016/S0928-4257(01)00015-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 11595425

AN - SCOPUS:0034751915

VL - 95

SP - 105

EP - 127

JO - Journal de Physiologie

JF - Journal de Physiologie

SN - 0928-4257

IS - 1-6

ER -