Gaming Disorder Is a Disorder due to Addictive Behaviors: Evidence from Behavioral and Neuroscientific Studies Addressing Cue Reactivity and Craving, Executive Functions, and Decision-Making

Matthias Brand, Hans Jürgen Rumpf, Zsolt Demetrovics, Daniel L. King, Marc N. Potenza, Elisa Wegmann

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of Review: This narrative review is aimed at summarizing the scientific evidence suggesting that the core psychological and neurobiological mechanisms underlying substance use disorders and gambling disorder are also involved in gaming disorder. Recent Findings: Theoretical models that aim to explain the development and maintenance of gaming disorder focus on cue reactivity and craving as well as on reduced inhibitory control processes and dysfunctional decision-making as core processes underlying symptoms of gaming disorder. The empirical evidence, including studies and meta-analyses with patients with gaming disorder and both nongamers and recreational gamers as control subjects, emphasizes the relevance of these theoretically argued core processes in gaming disorder. Summary: Scientific evidence suggests that the core mechanisms underlying substance use disorders and gambling disorder are also involved in gaming disorder. Inclusion of gaming disorder in ICD-11 as a disorder due to addictive behaviors, along with gambling disorder, is justified.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)296-302
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Addiction Reports
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 15 2019

Keywords

  • Behavioral addictions
  • Craving
  • Cue reactivity
  • Decision-making
  • Gaming disorder
  • Inhibitory control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

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