Galvanotactic and phototactic control of Tetrahymena pyriformis as a microfluidic workhorse

Dal Hyung Kim, David Casale, L. Kőhidai, Min Jun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A eukaryotic ciliate, Tetrahymena pyriformis, has been controlled using galvanotaxis and phototaxis in a low Reynolds number fluidic environment. A cell-tracking algorithm demonstrates the controllability of Tetrahymena pyriformis under two types of external stimuli. Electrical stimulation, in the form of a direct current electric field through the containing fluid, causes a change in swimming direction toward the cathode. Photostimulation, by high intensity broadband light, results in a rotational motion of the cells. The motivation of this work is to progress further with biological microfluidic actuators and sensors for use in engineered systems.

Original languageEnglish
Article number163901
JournalApplied Physics Letters
Volume94
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

fluidics
controllability
low Reynolds number
cells
stimulation
stimuli
actuators
cathodes
direct current
broadband
electric fields
causes
fluids
sensors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Galvanotactic and phototactic control of Tetrahymena pyriformis as a microfluidic workhorse. / Kim, Dal Hyung; Casale, David; Kőhidai, L.; Kim, Min Jun.

In: Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 94, No. 16, 163901, 2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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