Further aspects of the structure and magnetism of the layered compound Fe(III)ClMoO4: Mössbauer spectroscopy, susceptibility, and powder neutron diffraction studies

C. C. Torardi, W. M. Reiff, K. Lázár, J. H. Zhang, D. E. Cox

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Abstract

Aspects of the nuclear and magnetic structure of the three-dimensionally ordered state of the layered system Fe(III)ClMoO4 are elucidated primarily on the basis of single crystal and powder Mössbauer spectroscopy and neutron powder diffraction refinements at various temperatures. The antiferromagnetically coupled spins and easy axis of magnetization for Fe(III)ClMoO4 are indicated to lie in the tetragonal layers (ab planes) perpendicular to the c axis, which is parallel to the FeCl bond vector of a local C4v FeO4Cl chromophore. Additionally, the neutron diffraction data indicate a very significant c-axis contraction with decreasing temperature (2.7% between 295 and 5 K), with the rate of contraction being highest in the vicinity of the Néel temperature, TN (∼70 K). The structural changes that occur in the temperature range 300 to 5 K are discussed. Powder and single crystal magnetic susceptibility results to ∼1.6 K as well as high field Mössbauer spectra to ∼9 T are also presented. The latter indicate a spin flop transition with Hsf ∼1 T. Alternate views of the low-dimensional magnetism of FeClMoO4, evident as a broad maximum in its molar susceptibility at ∼105 K, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)105-115
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Solid State Chemistry
Volume66
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1987

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry
  • Materials Chemistry

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