Funkcionális mágnesesrezonancia-képalkotáson alapuló térképezési eljárások epilepsziában

Translated title of the contribution: Functional magnetic resonance imaging for cortical mapping in epilepsy

Lajos Rudolf Kozák, Vivien Tóth, P. Barsi, Gábor Rudas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is not only the total curative resection of pathological tissue or the minimization of symptoms to be considered in epilepsy surgery or other neurosurgical procedures, it is equally desirable to maintain the best possible quality of life. Cortical mapping methods can help achieve this goal by delineating eloquent areas, i.e. brain regions that are vital for providing an acceptable quality of life, albeit not prone to compensatory reorganization. These areas include among others the Broca and Wernicke regions for speech, the primary motor, sensory and visual cortices. Functional MRI gained importance in the last decade as a non-invasive clinical cortical mapping technique. This method is capable of localizing cortical areas selectively activated by a given task condition. Thus, selecting appropriate tasks can help mapping eloquent brain regions. Using functional MRI provides information that is complementary to other mapping methods. Moreover, it can replace invasive methods such as the Wada test. Here, we explain the background of functional MRI, compare it to other clinical mapping methods, explain the intricacies of paradigm selection, and show the limitations of the technique while also pointing out alternative uses.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)294-299
Number of pages6
JournalIdeggyógyászati szemle
Volume64
Issue number9-10
Publication statusPublished - Sep 30 2011

Fingerprint

Epilepsy
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Quality of Life
Brain Mapping
Neurosurgical Procedures
Motor Cortex
Visual Cortex
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Funkcionális mágnesesrezonancia-képalkotáson alapuló térképezési eljárások epilepsziában. / Kozák, Lajos Rudolf; Tóth, Vivien; Barsi, P.; Rudas, Gábor.

In: Ideggyógyászati szemle, Vol. 64, No. 9-10, 30.09.2011, p. 294-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kozák, Lajos Rudolf ; Tóth, Vivien ; Barsi, P. ; Rudas, Gábor. / Funkcionális mágnesesrezonancia-képalkotáson alapuló térképezési eljárások epilepsziában. In: Ideggyógyászati szemle. 2011 ; Vol. 64, No. 9-10. pp. 294-299.
@article{08188919446e44b78bf62ce0630c1732,
title = "Funkcion{\'a}lis m{\'a}gnesesrezonancia-k{\'e}palkot{\'a}son alapul{\'o} t{\'e}rk{\'e}pez{\'e}si elj{\'a}r{\'a}sok epilepszi{\'a}ban",
abstract = "It is not only the total curative resection of pathological tissue or the minimization of symptoms to be considered in epilepsy surgery or other neurosurgical procedures, it is equally desirable to maintain the best possible quality of life. Cortical mapping methods can help achieve this goal by delineating eloquent areas, i.e. brain regions that are vital for providing an acceptable quality of life, albeit not prone to compensatory reorganization. These areas include among others the Broca and Wernicke regions for speech, the primary motor, sensory and visual cortices. Functional MRI gained importance in the last decade as a non-invasive clinical cortical mapping technique. This method is capable of localizing cortical areas selectively activated by a given task condition. Thus, selecting appropriate tasks can help mapping eloquent brain regions. Using functional MRI provides information that is complementary to other mapping methods. Moreover, it can replace invasive methods such as the Wada test. Here, we explain the background of functional MRI, compare it to other clinical mapping methods, explain the intricacies of paradigm selection, and show the limitations of the technique while also pointing out alternative uses.",
keywords = "Cortical mapping, EEG-fMRI, Epilepsy, fMRI, Functional magnetic resonance imaging, Language lateralization, Presurgical planning, Resting-state fMRI",
author = "Koz{\'a}k, {Lajos Rudolf} and Vivien T{\'o}th and P. Barsi and G{\'a}bor Rudas",
year = "2011",
month = "9",
day = "30",
language = "Hungarian",
volume = "64",
pages = "294--299",
journal = "Ideggyogyaszati Szemle",
issn = "0019-1442",
publisher = "Ifjusagi Lap-es Konyvkiado Vallalat",
number = "9-10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Funkcionális mágnesesrezonancia-képalkotáson alapuló térképezési eljárások epilepsziában

AU - Kozák, Lajos Rudolf

AU - Tóth, Vivien

AU - Barsi, P.

AU - Rudas, Gábor

PY - 2011/9/30

Y1 - 2011/9/30

N2 - It is not only the total curative resection of pathological tissue or the minimization of symptoms to be considered in epilepsy surgery or other neurosurgical procedures, it is equally desirable to maintain the best possible quality of life. Cortical mapping methods can help achieve this goal by delineating eloquent areas, i.e. brain regions that are vital for providing an acceptable quality of life, albeit not prone to compensatory reorganization. These areas include among others the Broca and Wernicke regions for speech, the primary motor, sensory and visual cortices. Functional MRI gained importance in the last decade as a non-invasive clinical cortical mapping technique. This method is capable of localizing cortical areas selectively activated by a given task condition. Thus, selecting appropriate tasks can help mapping eloquent brain regions. Using functional MRI provides information that is complementary to other mapping methods. Moreover, it can replace invasive methods such as the Wada test. Here, we explain the background of functional MRI, compare it to other clinical mapping methods, explain the intricacies of paradigm selection, and show the limitations of the technique while also pointing out alternative uses.

AB - It is not only the total curative resection of pathological tissue or the minimization of symptoms to be considered in epilepsy surgery or other neurosurgical procedures, it is equally desirable to maintain the best possible quality of life. Cortical mapping methods can help achieve this goal by delineating eloquent areas, i.e. brain regions that are vital for providing an acceptable quality of life, albeit not prone to compensatory reorganization. These areas include among others the Broca and Wernicke regions for speech, the primary motor, sensory and visual cortices. Functional MRI gained importance in the last decade as a non-invasive clinical cortical mapping technique. This method is capable of localizing cortical areas selectively activated by a given task condition. Thus, selecting appropriate tasks can help mapping eloquent brain regions. Using functional MRI provides information that is complementary to other mapping methods. Moreover, it can replace invasive methods such as the Wada test. Here, we explain the background of functional MRI, compare it to other clinical mapping methods, explain the intricacies of paradigm selection, and show the limitations of the technique while also pointing out alternative uses.

KW - Cortical mapping

KW - EEG-fMRI

KW - Epilepsy

KW - fMRI

KW - Functional magnetic resonance imaging

KW - Language lateralization

KW - Presurgical planning

KW - Resting-state fMRI

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80054718560&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80054718560&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 22059362

AN - SCOPUS:80054718560

VL - 64

SP - 294

EP - 299

JO - Ideggyogyaszati Szemle

JF - Ideggyogyaszati Szemle

SN - 0019-1442

IS - 9-10

ER -