Functional Doppler sonography in a patient with global aphasia but sustained song recognition

S. Happe, V. Kemény, S. Evers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) provides an appropriate noninvasive method to evaluate hemispheric activation by cognitive tasks. We report a 62 year old right handed woman, no musician, with left cerebro-vascular accident (LCVA) leading to global aphasia and right hemiparesis. The patient was investigated 30 days and 6 months after stroke onset with bilateral Doppler sonography of the middle cerebral artery with 3 different acoustic stimuli (music without language content; music with language content; language without music). Neither language nor music stimulation induces any change of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the left hemisphere. However, language stimulation induces a significant decrease (p = 0.032) and music with language content induces a significant increase (p = 0.020) of CBFV on the right hemisphere as compared to baseline whereas pure music does not induce any changes at all. As expected, acoustic stimulation cannot induce any change in left CBFV in patients with LCVA. In the right hemisphere, however, language stimulation lead to a significant decrease of CBVF when presented alone and to a significant increase of CBVF when presented as music. We conclude that in our patient with global aphasia but sustained song recognition acoustical language stimulation is recognized as language but cannot be processed on the left hemisphere. Independent from aphasia, language together with music can lead to an increase of CBVF on the right hemisphere.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)216-217
Number of pages2
JournalNeurologie und Rehabilitation
Volume5
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Doppler Ultrasonography
Aphasia
Music
Language
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Blood Flow Velocity
Accidents
Blood Vessels
Doppler Transcranial Ultrasonography
Acoustic Stimulation
Women's Rights
Middle Cerebral Artery
Paresis
Acoustics
Stroke

Keywords

  • Cerebrovascular accident
  • fTCD
  • Music
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Functional Doppler sonography in a patient with global aphasia but sustained song recognition. / Happe, S.; Kemény, V.; Evers, S.

In: Neurologie und Rehabilitation, Vol. 5, No. 4, 1999, p. 216-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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