Frontal cortex functioning in the infant broader autism phenotype

Karla Holmboe, Mayada Elsabbagh, A. Volein, Leslie A. Tucker, Simon Baron-Cohen, Patrick Bolton, Tony Charman, Mark H. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Atypical attention has been proposed as a marker of the broader autism phenotype. In the present study we investigated this and the related process of inhibitory control at the youngest possible age through the study of infant siblings of children with an autism spectrum disorder (Sibs-ASD). Both attention and inhibition have been related to the frontal cortex of the brain. Nine- to ten-month-old Sibs-ASD and low-risk control infants completed the Freeze-Frame task, in which infants are encouraged to inhibit looks to peripherally presented distractors whilst looking at a central animation. The attractiveness of the central stimulus is varied in order to investigate the selectivity of infants' responses. In line with previous studies, it was found that a subset of Sibs-ASD infants had difficulty disengaging attention from a central stimulus in order to orient to a peripheral stimulus. The Sibs-ASD group also showed less Selective Inhibition than controls. However, Sibs-ASD infants did demonstrate Selective Inhibitory Learning. These results provide preliminary evidence for atypical frontal cortex functioning in the infant broader autism phenotype.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)482-491
Number of pages10
JournalInfant Behavior and Development
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010

Fingerprint

Frontal Lobe
Autistic Disorder
Phenotype
Siblings
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Learning
Brain

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Broader autism phenotype
  • Frontal cortex
  • Infancy
  • Inhibition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Holmboe, K., Elsabbagh, M., Volein, A., Tucker, L. A., Baron-Cohen, S., Bolton, P., ... Johnson, M. H. (2010). Frontal cortex functioning in the infant broader autism phenotype. Infant Behavior and Development, 33(4), 482-491. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.infbeh.2010.05.004

Frontal cortex functioning in the infant broader autism phenotype. / Holmboe, Karla; Elsabbagh, Mayada; Volein, A.; Tucker, Leslie A.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Bolton, Patrick; Charman, Tony; Johnson, Mark H.

In: Infant Behavior and Development, Vol. 33, No. 4, 12.2010, p. 482-491.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Holmboe, K, Elsabbagh, M, Volein, A, Tucker, LA, Baron-Cohen, S, Bolton, P, Charman, T & Johnson, MH 2010, 'Frontal cortex functioning in the infant broader autism phenotype', Infant Behavior and Development, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 482-491. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.infbeh.2010.05.004
Holmboe, Karla ; Elsabbagh, Mayada ; Volein, A. ; Tucker, Leslie A. ; Baron-Cohen, Simon ; Bolton, Patrick ; Charman, Tony ; Johnson, Mark H. / Frontal cortex functioning in the infant broader autism phenotype. In: Infant Behavior and Development. 2010 ; Vol. 33, No. 4. pp. 482-491.
@article{9c3b039b2a6f4ae397eb5373434b87c7,
title = "Frontal cortex functioning in the infant broader autism phenotype",
abstract = "Atypical attention has been proposed as a marker of the broader autism phenotype. In the present study we investigated this and the related process of inhibitory control at the youngest possible age through the study of infant siblings of children with an autism spectrum disorder (Sibs-ASD). Both attention and inhibition have been related to the frontal cortex of the brain. Nine- to ten-month-old Sibs-ASD and low-risk control infants completed the Freeze-Frame task, in which infants are encouraged to inhibit looks to peripherally presented distractors whilst looking at a central animation. The attractiveness of the central stimulus is varied in order to investigate the selectivity of infants' responses. In line with previous studies, it was found that a subset of Sibs-ASD infants had difficulty disengaging attention from a central stimulus in order to orient to a peripheral stimulus. The Sibs-ASD group also showed less Selective Inhibition than controls. However, Sibs-ASD infants did demonstrate Selective Inhibitory Learning. These results provide preliminary evidence for atypical frontal cortex functioning in the infant broader autism phenotype.",
keywords = "Attention, Broader autism phenotype, Frontal cortex, Infancy, Inhibition",
author = "Karla Holmboe and Mayada Elsabbagh and A. Volein and Tucker, {Leslie A.} and Simon Baron-Cohen and Patrick Bolton and Tony Charman and Johnson, {Mark H.}",
year = "2010",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.infbeh.2010.05.004",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "482--491",
journal = "Infant Behavior and Development",
issn = "0163-6383",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Frontal cortex functioning in the infant broader autism phenotype

AU - Holmboe, Karla

AU - Elsabbagh, Mayada

AU - Volein, A.

AU - Tucker, Leslie A.

AU - Baron-Cohen, Simon

AU - Bolton, Patrick

AU - Charman, Tony

AU - Johnson, Mark H.

PY - 2010/12

Y1 - 2010/12

N2 - Atypical attention has been proposed as a marker of the broader autism phenotype. In the present study we investigated this and the related process of inhibitory control at the youngest possible age through the study of infant siblings of children with an autism spectrum disorder (Sibs-ASD). Both attention and inhibition have been related to the frontal cortex of the brain. Nine- to ten-month-old Sibs-ASD and low-risk control infants completed the Freeze-Frame task, in which infants are encouraged to inhibit looks to peripherally presented distractors whilst looking at a central animation. The attractiveness of the central stimulus is varied in order to investigate the selectivity of infants' responses. In line with previous studies, it was found that a subset of Sibs-ASD infants had difficulty disengaging attention from a central stimulus in order to orient to a peripheral stimulus. The Sibs-ASD group also showed less Selective Inhibition than controls. However, Sibs-ASD infants did demonstrate Selective Inhibitory Learning. These results provide preliminary evidence for atypical frontal cortex functioning in the infant broader autism phenotype.

AB - Atypical attention has been proposed as a marker of the broader autism phenotype. In the present study we investigated this and the related process of inhibitory control at the youngest possible age through the study of infant siblings of children with an autism spectrum disorder (Sibs-ASD). Both attention and inhibition have been related to the frontal cortex of the brain. Nine- to ten-month-old Sibs-ASD and low-risk control infants completed the Freeze-Frame task, in which infants are encouraged to inhibit looks to peripherally presented distractors whilst looking at a central animation. The attractiveness of the central stimulus is varied in order to investigate the selectivity of infants' responses. In line with previous studies, it was found that a subset of Sibs-ASD infants had difficulty disengaging attention from a central stimulus in order to orient to a peripheral stimulus. The Sibs-ASD group also showed less Selective Inhibition than controls. However, Sibs-ASD infants did demonstrate Selective Inhibitory Learning. These results provide preliminary evidence for atypical frontal cortex functioning in the infant broader autism phenotype.

KW - Attention

KW - Broader autism phenotype

KW - Frontal cortex

KW - Infancy

KW - Inhibition

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78649874899&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78649874899&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.infbeh.2010.05.004

DO - 10.1016/j.infbeh.2010.05.004

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 482

EP - 491

JO - Infant Behavior and Development

JF - Infant Behavior and Development

SN - 0163-6383

IS - 4

ER -