Freeze-dried human serum albumin improves the adherence and proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells on mineralized human bone allografts.

Miklós Weszl, Gábor Skaliczki, Attila Cselenyák, Levente Kiss, Tibor Major, Károly Schandl, Eszter Bognár, Guido Stadler, Anja Peterbauer, Lajos Csönge, Zsombor Lacza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mineralized scaffolds are widely used as bone grafts with the assumption that bone marrow derived cells colonize and remodel them. This process is slow and often unreliable so we aimed to improve the biocompatibility of bone grafts by pre-seeding them with human mesenchymal stem cells from either bone marrow or dental pulp. Under standard cell culture conditions very low number of seeded cells remained on the surface of freeze-dried human or bovine bone graft or hydroxyapatite. Coating the scaffolds with fibronectin or collagen improved seeding efficiency but the cells failed to grow on the surface until the 18th day. In contrast, human albumin was a very potent facilitator of both seeding and proliferation on allografts which was further improved by culturing in a rotating bioreactor. Electron microscopy revealed that cells do not form a monolayer but span the pores, emphasizing the importance of pore size and microstructure. Albumin coated bone chips were able to unite a rat femoral segmental defect, while uncoated ones did not. Micro-hardness measurements confirmed that albumin coating does not influence the physical characteristics of the scaffold, so it is possible to introduce albumin coating into the manufacturing process of lyophilized bone allografts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)489-496
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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