Forced-flow planar layer liquid chromatographic techniques for the separation and isolation of natural substances

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Column and layer liquid chromatographic techniques as supplementary techniques due to their arrangements have always been characteristically developed in constant mutual interaction. Hence it is not surprising that the intensive development of forcedflow column liquid chromatography (high-performance liquid chromatography, HPLC) as originally potential planar layer version of HPLC entailed the need for the fundamental renewal of the most popular planar layer liquid chromatographic technique, TLC. HPTLC is based on the use of fine particle chromatoplates with narrow particle size distribution of adsorbent and is carried out with capillary-driven separation and sophisticated instrumentation [1]. However, the greatly increased developing time on a fine particle adsorbent layer (quadratic law exists concerning the front migration distance against the time [2]) made it necessary to employ forced mobile phase flow generating or at least approaching the optimum linear velocity to yield the highest efficiency of separation allowed by the layer adsorbent bed characteristic.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThin Layer Chromatography in Phytochemistry
PublisherCRC Press
Pages215-251
Number of pages37
ISBN (Electronic)9781420046786
ISBN (Print)9781420046779
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2008

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adsorbents
Adsorbents
chromatography
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
High performance liquid chromatography
liquids
Liquids
high performance liquid chromatography
Particle Size
Liquid Chromatography
Column chromatography
Liquid chromatography
instrumentation
particle size distribution
Particle size analysis
liquid chromatography
Particles (particulate matter)
methodology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Forced-flow planar layer liquid chromatographic techniques for the separation and isolation of natural substances. / Mincsovics, E.

Thin Layer Chromatography in Phytochemistry. CRC Press, 2008. p. 215-251.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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