Food consumption and screen-based sedentary behaviors in European adolescents: The HELENA study

Alba M. Santaliestra-Pasías, Theodora Mouratidou, Vera Verbestel, Inge Huybrechts, Frederic Gottrand, Cinzia Le Donne, Magdalena Cuenca-García, Ligia E. Díaz, Anthony Kafatos, Yannis Manios, D. Molnár, Michael Sjos̈tröm, Kurt Widhalm, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij, Luis A. Moreno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the association between time spent on different sedentary behaviors and consumption of certain food and beverage groups in a sample of European adolescents. Design : Data from the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence Cross-sectional Study. Setting: Eight survey centers (Athens, Dortmund, Ghent, Lille, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna, and Zaragoza). Participants: A total of 2202 participants (45.5% boys) aged 12 1/2 to 17 1/2 years. Main Outcome Measures: Information on sedentary behaviors (weekdays and weekends) collected via a standardized self-reported questionnaire, including watching television, playing computer and video games, using the Internet for studying or recreation, and studying. Food and beverage consumption data of selected groups were obtained using 2 nonconsecutive 24-hour recalls. Results: Boys reporting more than 4 h/d of watching television, playing computer games, and using the Internet for recreation were more likely to consume sweetened beverages (weekends) (odds ratio [OR], 1.83 [95% CI, 1.21- 2.75]; 1.99 [1.31-3.01]; and 1.73 [1.03-2.91], respectively), and less likely to consume fruit (weekdays) (0.39 [0.21-0.72], 0.37 [0.18-0.77], and 0.39 [0.19-0.78], respectively) than those who spent less than 2 h/d. Girls spending more time per day watching television and playing computer or video games (weekdays) and playing computer games or surfing the Internet for recreation (weekends) were more likely to drink sweetened beverages (OR, 1.89 [95% CI, 1.21-2.94]; 1.57 [1.00-2.46]; 2.14 [1.16- 3.97]; and 2.30 [1.24-4.28], respectively) and less likely to consume fruit (weekdays) (0.43 [0.23-0.80], 0.40 [0.19-0.83], 0.37 [0.14-0.94], and 0.42 [0.20-0.85], respectively) than those who spent less than 2 h/d. Conclusion : Increased television viewing and computer and Internet use during adolescence is associated with higher odds of consumption of sweetened beverages and lower odds of fruit consumption.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1010-1020
Number of pages11
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume166
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012

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Video Games
Television
Food
Recreation
Internet
Beverages
Food and Beverages
Fruit
Odds Ratio
Cross-Sectional Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Santaliestra-Pasías, A. M., Mouratidou, T., Verbestel, V., Huybrechts, I., Gottrand, F., Le Donne, C., ... Moreno, L. A. (2012). Food consumption and screen-based sedentary behaviors in European adolescents: The HELENA study. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 166(11), 1010-1020. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.646

Food consumption and screen-based sedentary behaviors in European adolescents : The HELENA study. / Santaliestra-Pasías, Alba M.; Mouratidou, Theodora; Verbestel, Vera; Huybrechts, Inge; Gottrand, Frederic; Le Donne, Cinzia; Cuenca-García, Magdalena; Díaz, Ligia E.; Kafatos, Anthony; Manios, Yannis; Molnár, D.; Sjos̈tröm, Michael; Widhalm, Kurt; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Moreno, Luis A.

In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 166, No. 11, 11.2012, p. 1010-1020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Santaliestra-Pasías, AM, Mouratidou, T, Verbestel, V, Huybrechts, I, Gottrand, F, Le Donne, C, Cuenca-García, M, Díaz, LE, Kafatos, A, Manios, Y, Molnár, D, Sjos̈tröm, M, Widhalm, K, De Bourdeaudhuij, I & Moreno, LA 2012, 'Food consumption and screen-based sedentary behaviors in European adolescents: The HELENA study', Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, vol. 166, no. 11, pp. 1010-1020. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.646
Santaliestra-Pasías AM, Mouratidou T, Verbestel V, Huybrechts I, Gottrand F, Le Donne C et al. Food consumption and screen-based sedentary behaviors in European adolescents: The HELENA study. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. 2012 Nov;166(11):1010-1020. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.646
Santaliestra-Pasías, Alba M. ; Mouratidou, Theodora ; Verbestel, Vera ; Huybrechts, Inge ; Gottrand, Frederic ; Le Donne, Cinzia ; Cuenca-García, Magdalena ; Díaz, Ligia E. ; Kafatos, Anthony ; Manios, Yannis ; Molnár, D. ; Sjos̈tröm, Michael ; Widhalm, Kurt ; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse ; Moreno, Luis A. / Food consumption and screen-based sedentary behaviors in European adolescents : The HELENA study. In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 166, No. 11. pp. 1010-1020.
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abstract = "Objective: To examine the association between time spent on different sedentary behaviors and consumption of certain food and beverage groups in a sample of European adolescents. Design : Data from the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence Cross-sectional Study. Setting: Eight survey centers (Athens, Dortmund, Ghent, Lille, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna, and Zaragoza). Participants: A total of 2202 participants (45.5{\%} boys) aged 12 1/2 to 17 1/2 years. Main Outcome Measures: Information on sedentary behaviors (weekdays and weekends) collected via a standardized self-reported questionnaire, including watching television, playing computer and video games, using the Internet for studying or recreation, and studying. Food and beverage consumption data of selected groups were obtained using 2 nonconsecutive 24-hour recalls. Results: Boys reporting more than 4 h/d of watching television, playing computer games, and using the Internet for recreation were more likely to consume sweetened beverages (weekends) (odds ratio [OR], 1.83 [95{\%} CI, 1.21- 2.75]; 1.99 [1.31-3.01]; and 1.73 [1.03-2.91], respectively), and less likely to consume fruit (weekdays) (0.39 [0.21-0.72], 0.37 [0.18-0.77], and 0.39 [0.19-0.78], respectively) than those who spent less than 2 h/d. Girls spending more time per day watching television and playing computer or video games (weekdays) and playing computer games or surfing the Internet for recreation (weekends) were more likely to drink sweetened beverages (OR, 1.89 [95{\%} CI, 1.21-2.94]; 1.57 [1.00-2.46]; 2.14 [1.16- 3.97]; and 2.30 [1.24-4.28], respectively) and less likely to consume fruit (weekdays) (0.43 [0.23-0.80], 0.40 [0.19-0.83], 0.37 [0.14-0.94], and 0.42 [0.20-0.85], respectively) than those who spent less than 2 h/d. Conclusion : Increased television viewing and computer and Internet use during adolescence is associated with higher odds of consumption of sweetened beverages and lower odds of fruit consumption.",
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AU - Santaliestra-Pasías, Alba M.

AU - Mouratidou, Theodora

AU - Verbestel, Vera

AU - Huybrechts, Inge

AU - Gottrand, Frederic

AU - Le Donne, Cinzia

AU - Cuenca-García, Magdalena

AU - Díaz, Ligia E.

AU - Kafatos, Anthony

AU - Manios, Yannis

AU - Molnár, D.

AU - Sjos̈tröm, Michael

AU - Widhalm, Kurt

AU - De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

AU - Moreno, Luis A.

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