Focus on: Alcohol and the liver

G. Szabó, Pranoti Mandrekar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thirty-five years ago Charles Lieber and colleagues (1975) published a seminal article in liver research, showing that alcohol itself is the primary cause for the higher prevalence of liver disease seen in alcoholic patients and not dietary deficiencies and malnutrition that often accompany alcoholism. Their groundbreaking research dispelled previously held theories that alcohol was not a major cause of liver damage and led to several decades of study of the deleterious effects of alcohol and its metabolism on the liver. Since that early study, clinical and experimental studies have continued to show a firm connection between high amounts of alcohol consumption and liver disease. This article tracks advances in alcoholrelated liver disease research over the past 40 years and describes how these discoveries are helping scientists to gain insight into therapeutic targets that may help to combat this lifethreatening disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-96
Number of pages10
JournalAlcohol Research and Health
Volume33
Issue number1-2
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Liver Diseases
Alcohols
Liver
Research
Alcoholics
Malnutrition
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism
Therapeutics
Clinical Studies

Keywords

  • Alcohol metabolism
  • Alcoholic liver disease
  • Alcoholism
  • Alcoholrelated liver injury
  • Cirrhosis
  • Hepatitis
  • Liver
  • Liver disease
  • Steatosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Szabó, G., & Mandrekar, P. (2010). Focus on: Alcohol and the liver. Alcohol Research and Health, 33(1-2), 87-96.

Focus on : Alcohol and the liver. / Szabó, G.; Mandrekar, Pranoti.

In: Alcohol Research and Health, Vol. 33, No. 1-2, 2010, p. 87-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Szabó, G & Mandrekar, P 2010, 'Focus on: Alcohol and the liver', Alcohol Research and Health, vol. 33, no. 1-2, pp. 87-96.
Szabó, G. ; Mandrekar, Pranoti. / Focus on : Alcohol and the liver. In: Alcohol Research and Health. 2010 ; Vol. 33, No. 1-2. pp. 87-96.
@article{f59abb9e2a504b64b8b0272b83d2d326,
title = "Focus on: Alcohol and the liver",
abstract = "Thirty-five years ago Charles Lieber and colleagues (1975) published a seminal article in liver research, showing that alcohol itself is the primary cause for the higher prevalence of liver disease seen in alcoholic patients and not dietary deficiencies and malnutrition that often accompany alcoholism. Their groundbreaking research dispelled previously held theories that alcohol was not a major cause of liver damage and led to several decades of study of the deleterious effects of alcohol and its metabolism on the liver. Since that early study, clinical and experimental studies have continued to show a firm connection between high amounts of alcohol consumption and liver disease. This article tracks advances in alcoholrelated liver disease research over the past 40 years and describes how these discoveries are helping scientists to gain insight into therapeutic targets that may help to combat this lifethreatening disease.",
keywords = "Alcohol metabolism, Alcoholic liver disease, Alcoholism, Alcoholrelated liver injury, Cirrhosis, Hepatitis, Liver, Liver disease, Steatosis",
author = "G. Szab{\'o} and Pranoti Mandrekar",
year = "2010",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "87--96",
journal = "Alcohol research : current reviews",
issn = "2168-3492",
publisher = "National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)",
number = "1-2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Focus on

T2 - Alcohol and the liver

AU - Szabó, G.

AU - Mandrekar, Pranoti

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Thirty-five years ago Charles Lieber and colleagues (1975) published a seminal article in liver research, showing that alcohol itself is the primary cause for the higher prevalence of liver disease seen in alcoholic patients and not dietary deficiencies and malnutrition that often accompany alcoholism. Their groundbreaking research dispelled previously held theories that alcohol was not a major cause of liver damage and led to several decades of study of the deleterious effects of alcohol and its metabolism on the liver. Since that early study, clinical and experimental studies have continued to show a firm connection between high amounts of alcohol consumption and liver disease. This article tracks advances in alcoholrelated liver disease research over the past 40 years and describes how these discoveries are helping scientists to gain insight into therapeutic targets that may help to combat this lifethreatening disease.

AB - Thirty-five years ago Charles Lieber and colleagues (1975) published a seminal article in liver research, showing that alcohol itself is the primary cause for the higher prevalence of liver disease seen in alcoholic patients and not dietary deficiencies and malnutrition that often accompany alcoholism. Their groundbreaking research dispelled previously held theories that alcohol was not a major cause of liver damage and led to several decades of study of the deleterious effects of alcohol and its metabolism on the liver. Since that early study, clinical and experimental studies have continued to show a firm connection between high amounts of alcohol consumption and liver disease. This article tracks advances in alcoholrelated liver disease research over the past 40 years and describes how these discoveries are helping scientists to gain insight into therapeutic targets that may help to combat this lifethreatening disease.

KW - Alcohol metabolism

KW - Alcoholic liver disease

KW - Alcoholism

KW - Alcoholrelated liver injury

KW - Cirrhosis

KW - Hepatitis

KW - Liver

KW - Liver disease

KW - Steatosis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77956589943&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77956589943&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 23579939

AN - SCOPUS:77956589943

VL - 33

SP - 87

EP - 96

JO - Alcohol research : current reviews

JF - Alcohol research : current reviews

SN - 2168-3492

IS - 1-2

ER -