Fly larvicidal activity in the faeces of cattle and pigs treated with endectocide products

R. Farkas, A. Gyurcsó, L. Börzsönyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bioassays were conducted to study the effect of a single therapeutic dose of injectable ivermectin, doramectin or moxidectin given to cattle and pigs and excreted in their faeces, against larvae of the housefly, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae). Five cattle were treated with each of the test products. Cattle faecal samples were collected before treatment and on days 1, 2, 3, 6, 10, 16, 20, 23 and 28 after treatment. Three groups of pigs, each comprising 12-14 pregnant sows and gilts, were used in the experiment. Pig faeces was collected from each group before treatment and on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15 and 20 after treatment. Thirty, first-stage larvae were placed into 100 g of faeces. Five replicates were examined for each time-point and for each endectocide group. Evaluation was based on the number of larvae surviving to adult emergence. Low numbers of adults emerged from samples taken from cattle 1 day after treatment, indicating that ivermectin and doramectin were rapidly excreted in the faeces and affected the development of the house fly. A larvicidal effect of both drugs in cattle faeces was present for a period of about 3-4 weeks and lasted a few days longer in cattle treated with doramectin than with ivermectin. In cattle, the larvicidal activity of moxidectin was first observed in faecal samples collected 2 days post-treatment; however, it killed fewer larvae than the other two drugs. The larvicidal effect of moxidectin subsequently decreased. Ivermectin and doramectin exhibited a pronounced larvicidal effect against the house fly in the faeces of pigs. The effect of doramectin was of longer duration. Moxidectin gave the weakest larvicidal effect in pig faeces. The main difference between the results obtained for the two livestock species is that peak toxicity occurred relatively later and for a shorter duration in pig than in cattle faeces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)301-306
Number of pages6
JournalMedical and Veterinary Entomology
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2003

Fingerprint

antiparasitic agents
Feces
pig
feces
cattle
doramectin
Swine
ivermectin
Ivermectin
moxidectin
swine
Larva
Musca domestica
Diptera
larva
Houseflies
larvae
Therapeutics
drug
Muscidae

Keywords

  • Cattle
  • Doramectin
  • Endectocides
  • Housefly
  • Hungary
  • Ivermectin
  • Larvicidal activity
  • Moxidectin
  • Musca domestica
  • Pig

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Fly larvicidal activity in the faeces of cattle and pigs treated with endectocide products. / Farkas, R.; Gyurcsó, A.; Börzsönyi, L.

In: Medical and Veterinary Entomology, Vol. 17, No. 3, 09.2003, p. 301-306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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