First result of differentiated communication - To smokers and non-smokers - In order to increase the voluntary participation rate in lung screening

Mariann Moizs, Gábor Bajzik, Zsuzsanna Lelovics, Marianna Rakvács, J. Strausz, I. Repa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Lung cancer is the most common fatal malignacy and also the primary cause of cancer mortality. Participation in lung screening is an important step in diagnosing patient in early stage and it can promise better outcomes. The aim of this preliminary study was to determinate the differences in the participation rate of smokers and non-smokers in lung cancer screening and to determine the communication strategies to increase the participation rate. Methods. In the given period of time (from May to August 2012) out of 1426 people who participated in the lung screening program 1,060 adult volunteers (331 males and 729 females, average age 54.0±9.3 years), completed fully and anonymously author's questionnaire that contained 28 questions. 25.7% of the respondents were smokers (n=272), 64.6% have never smoked, while 9.7% were former smokers. Results: Mostly former smokers considered lung screening as an effective method for early detection of pulmonary diseases (86.4%). The most important source (41.0%) of information was the general practitioner. The participation rate of non-smokers is higher in lung screening than the ratio of non-smokers in the population. The unclear data suggest that smokers need distinct, concise messages to know why they should regularly undergo lung screening and doctors have a major role in this. Conclusions: We found that smokers significantly more frequently took part in lung screening annually. It is positive that the participation rate of former smokers is higher than non-smokers, it is just a bit lower than the participation rate of smokers - both in annual and biannual participation. The participation rate of non-smokers is higher in lung screening than the rate of non-smokers in the population.

Original languageEnglish
Article number914
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Communication
Lung
Lung Neoplasms
Early Detection of Cancer
General Practitioners
Population
Lung Diseases
Early Diagnosis
Volunteers
Mortality
Neoplasms
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Communication strategy
  • Lung cancer
  • Lung screening
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

First result of differentiated communication - To smokers and non-smokers - In order to increase the voluntary participation rate in lung screening. / Moizs, Mariann; Bajzik, Gábor; Lelovics, Zsuzsanna; Rakvács, Marianna; Strausz, J.; Repa, I.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 13, No. 1, 914, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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